Spirit of the Entrepreneur

These 5 characteristics will take you far as you start your business.

You hear it all the time from famous entrepreneurs: Long before they were running multimillion-dollar companies, they were flexing their entrepreneurial skills by selling lemonade on the corner, building gadgets in their garage or hosting weekly college beer pong tournaments. It seems that behind every successful mogul is a kid who grew up knowing they were born for business.

But what exactly is it that sets entrepreneurs apart from the rest? What is it that makes certain people believe in themselves enough to take the prospect of failure head-on and have the determination to come out on top? It takes a special kind of person to set an idea in motion, riding the highs and lows from humble beginnings to ultimate success.

The entrepreneurial spirit is a gift that inspires others to become the best they can be. From passion and positivity to leadership and ambition, here are the entrepreneurs that best define the entrepreneurial spirit.

Passion
No one embodies the word "passion" quite like Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin mega-brand. Part of Branson's passion lies in his insatiable appetite for starting companies. Founded in 1970, the Virgin Group has expanded to more than 200 companies, ranging from music, publishing, mobile phones and even space travel. "Businesses are like buses," he once said. "There's always another one coming."

Part of Branson's appeal is that he not only has passion for business, but an incredible passion for life. Branson is famous for his adventurous streak and zest for life, making him one of the most admired entrepreneurs for his ability to have a successful work/life balance.

Positivity
Jeff Bezos knows the power of positive thinking. Living by the motto that "every challenge is an opportunity," Bezos set out to create the biggest bookstore in the world with a little internet startup called Amazon.

Amazon.com launched in July 1995, and with no press, managed to sell $20,000 a week within two months. By the end of the '90s, though, the dot-com bust had brought Amazon's shares from $100 to $6. To add insult to injury, critics predicted that the launch of Barnes & Nobles' rival website would wipe out Amazon. Instead of hiding in the corner, Bezos came out fighting with optimism and confidence, pointing out to critics all the positive things his company had accomplished and would continue to do.

Bezos continued to expand Amazon, which now sells everything from books to clothes to toys and more. Bezos claims his wife loves to say, "If Jeff is unhappy, wait three minutes." Thanks to Bezos' positive thinking, Amazon.com has grown into a $5.7 billion company.

Adaptability
Having the ability to adapt is one of the greatest strengths an entrepreneur can have. Every successful business owner must be willing to improve, refine and customize their services to continually give customers what they want.

Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page take this concept a step further by not just reacting to change, but leading the way. Google continually leads the internet with innovative ideas that allow people to see and do things in ways they couldn't before (think Google Earth). With their ability to continually be one step ahead, its no wonder Google is one of the most powerful companies on the web.

Leadership
A good leader is someone with charisma, a sense of ethics and a desire to build integrity within an organization–someone who's enthusiastic, team oriented and a great teacher. All of these attributes were embodied by the late Mary Kay Ash, founder of Mary Kay Cosmetics, a company that has helped more than half a million women fulfill their dreams of owning a business.

Ash's story began as a single mother, working in sales for a home products company. Despite being one of the top sales directors for 25 years, Ash was repeatedly refused the promotions and pay raises her male co-workers were receiving. Fed up with the way she was being treated, Ash started Mary Kay Inc. in 1963 with $5,000.

Ash was best known for being a powerful motivator and inspirational leader, creating a company with a "You can do it!" attitude. Her sometimes over-the-top incentives included the famous pink Cadillacs she would give top sales directors. Thanks to her powerful leadership skills, Ash has been named one of the 25 most influential business leaders in the last 35 years, and her company has been recognized as one of the best companies to work for in America.

Ambition
At age 20, Debbi Fields didn't have much. She was a young housewife with no business experience, but what she did have was a great chocolate chip cookie recipe and a dream to share it with the world.

Fields opened her first Mrs. Field's store1977, despite being told she was crazy to believe a business could survive solely on selling cookies. Fields' headstrong determination and ambition helped her grow her little cookie store into a $450 million company with more than 600 locations in the U.S. and 10 foreign nations.

How To Improve Your Life By Discovering Your Why

How To Improve Your Life By Discovering Your Why

We live in a world filled by constant distractions. There are unlimited activities floating around us at all times that can take our attention, and often the ones that scream the loudest win. A simple way to improve your life is to discover your personal why.

 

Most people live their lives by focusing on what they have to do. The endless tasks continue to mount up, and we wonder why we never feel like we’re getting ahead. It feels like we’re sprinting on a treadmill just trying to keep up, and every task completed is quickly replaced by new ones.

 

Life gets a lot simpler when we stop to ask ourselves why we do things.

What Is The Purpose Of Your Life?

Now this is not some big esoteric question that you will ponder for a lifetime. It’s really just something that you decide for yourself and can change at any time. What is the list of things that are most important to you in your life?

 

I find it helps to write down things that you really love doing. Maybe it’s spending time with friends and family, doing a particular hobby, your job, or traveling. The answers are going to be different for every single person reading.

 

What’s important… is what’s important to you. It’s very hard to improve your life if you don’t know what improvement actually looks like for you personally.

Refining Your List Of Priorities

Once you have your initial list, you want to look at what’s really important to you. You do that by asking yourself why you love it and why it’s important to have it in your life. I’ve been doing this exercise over the last 3 years and found that my list got more and more refined as I went.

 

You also want to look at how much time you put into these activities that you love. Do you get to spend as much time as you’d like with each one, or do they get pushed to the back behind the other tasks in your daily life?

Discovering What’s Really Important

If you made another list of all the things you are actually doing in your life, then you’ll probably find a bunch of things you don’t really love. Some people may hate cooking and others will love it. Everyone is unique, and this is about finding out what you want to be doing… not what you feel you should be doing.

 

It’s easy to fill our lives up with things that don’t really matter to us. The trick is to ask ourselves how we spend less time doing unimportant things and more time doing the things we love. It’s not a perfect process where you can drop everything right now, but as you focus from this point on, you’ll be amazed at the results.

Always Ask Why

Whenever a new item comes across your plate, you simply ask yourself why. Is it really important to join that new committee for your child’s school or would it be more effective to actually spend that time with your children instead? Does it matter if you miss your gym time at lunch because your boss needs you to work overtime or is your fitness break more important to you?

 

As I said before, everybody will be different. Some will rank career over fitness and other’s will rank it in reverse. What matters is that you’re making the choice that is right for you.

It May Sound Simple… But That Doesn’t Mean It’s Easy

Our world is full of expectations that are placed on us by others… and also by ourselves. We’re expected to be super people that run around and accomplish a myriad of different things every day to be great at work and at home. People will often look at you strangely when they ask you how you are and you don’t answer with “busy” with that frantic look in your eye.

 

However, once you start examining your life through the lens of why, you’ll start asking yourself, “What’s important to me?” You need to step away from society’s expectations and start focusing on and refining your own expectations instead. When you do this, you’ll see the world from an entirely different viewpoint and be free to improve your life in any area that really matters to you.

 

It can be easy to run through the maze of life without pausing to think of its meaning. Does what I’m doing matter?

Does what I’m doing matter?

More importantly, does it matter to me?

 

Feeling that what you’re doing has a real purpose and meaning that matters to you can make a huge difference in your life. It makes getting up each day the most exciting thing in the world. You can’t wait to get started. Forget trying to force yourself to work hard, it becomes more important to remind yourself to take breaks to eat!

 

But how can we cultivate a more meaningful life? The answer is usually complicated. It can depend on many factors. I’ve written down 10 ideas that I believe will help you find meaning in your life every day, so that you can’t wait to get up in the morning and see what the day will bring.

 

1. Know What’s Important

Know what’s important for you. Write down your top 5 things that you believe are the essence of how you want to live life. This can include things like “family time,” or “sing every day.” It could also include more complex ideas, like “honesty” and “simplicity.”

 

2. Pursue Your Passion

I believe everyone should pursue their passion in life. It’s what makes life worth living, and gives our lives true meaning and purpose. Each time you work on something you love, it creates joy inside you like nothing else. Finding a way to use your passions to give back to the world will give your life ultimate meaning.

If you can’t manage (or aren’t ready) to work on your passion for a living, be sure and make time for it every day. By working on your passion and becoming an expert in it, you will eventually have the opportunity to make money from it. Be ready to seize that opportunity!

 

3. Discover Your Life’s Purpose

If you had to give yourself a reason to live, what would it be? What would you stand for? What principles do you hold highest? Is your life’s purpose to help others? Is it to inspire others with great works of art, or you words? Finding your life’s purpose is a daunting task, and when I first heard the idea, I had no idea where to start. For methods on discovering your life’s purpose, I recommend Steve Pavlina’s blog entries on the subject. I also recommend reading the article What Makes Life Worth Living.

 

4. Be Self-Aware

Be aware of yourself and your actions. Remain mindful of what you do at all times, and make sure you are living life according to your principles, your life’s purpose, and what you are passionate about. Review your actions each day, taking stock of those that strayed from your path. Work towards correcting any incidents in the future. Meditation is a great tool for accomplishing this task. It helps us increase our self-awareness throughout the day.

 

5. Focus

Rather than chasing 3 or 4 goals and making very little progress on them, place all of your energy on one thing. Focus. Not only will you alleviate some of the stress associated with trying to juggle so many tasks, you will be much more successful. Try and align your goal with something you are passionate about, so that there will be an intrinsic drive to work hard and do well.

 

6. People More Than Things

Often, we are faced with wanting to buy material goods. I recommend you consider carefully what you purchase, and think more about spending your money on experiences with friends and family. Not only will this give deeper meaning to your life by focusing on your relationships rather than material wealth, but you will be a happier person as a result.

 

7. Live With Compassion

Both for yourself, and others. Keep in mind the following quote:

"One must be compassionate to one's self before external compassion" – Dalai Lama

For some, compassion is the purpose of life, what gives it meaning, and what leads to ultimate happiness.

 

8. Find a Way to Give Back

Do something that both honors your beliefs and passions, while giving something back to the world. By giving something back, we inevitably find purpose in the act. By cultivating more of these activities, you will find your life has more meaning and purpose behind it.

 

9. Simplify Your Life

By simplifying your life, you’ll have more time to do what fulfills you and gives your life meaning. It can also help reduce stress and make your overall life easier to manage. It can also greatly improve your productivity. If you’ve never tried to simplify things before, it really is a great feeling.

 

10. Set Daily Goals

In the morning, before you start your day, create a list of 3 goals that you find fulfilling and meaningful. Make sure they adhere to your set of principles and beliefs. Tackle the hardest things first! Don’t make this list too long. By placing too many things on the list, you’ll feel the urge to multi-task, which is not good, or you’ll feel overwhelmed, which isn’t good either. By trying to do less, you’ll end up doing more.

 

Doing all of these things at once may seem daunting, but you can pick one thing at a time and slowly incorporate the ideas into your life. Life is about the journey, not the destination. Living a life of purpose gives both fulfillment and meaning to your journey.

Just trying to hire Mellenials is a challenge

Trying to Manage Millennials at Work? Here's How Facebook Does It.

Figuring out how to recruit, retain and motivate millennials – those born after 1980 – can be a fraught exercise. We’re talking about a generation that has been the subject of a million, often-contradictory think pieces – depending on your perspective, millennials are either hard-working, ambitious and clear-headed or lazy, entitled, and delusional. Understandably, building an actionable management strategy on these muddled generalizations can be tough for any company.

As guidance, then, perhaps it’s helpful to examine the tangible ways one very successful company manages its millennial employees: Let’s take a look at Facebook.

Facebook knows a thing or two about millennials — According to a recent study by Payscale, the median age at the tech company is 28, meaning the vast majority of its employees fall squarely within the generation’s age bracket. To effectively manage its overwhelmingly young workforce, Facebook has adopted a set of somewhat unconventional set of management techniques, The Wall Street Journal reports, one that caters to employees’ thirst for freedom and control as well as their aversion to inertia and top-down leadership.

1. Conversational management style

At most companies, managers tell employees what to do. That’s not necessarily how it works at Facebook. According to the Journal, even entry-level employees are encouraged to question manager’s decisions, and offer up their own solutions and feedback. In addition, the manager-employee relationship isn’t always based on giving orders on one side, and executing them on the other. Instead, managers are tasked with making it easier for employees to achieve their own, individual goals. “Sometimes their role is to help you get the resources you need and to move things out of your way,” one former Facebook sales team employee told the outlet.

2. Shifting roles

Millennials are often characterized as flighty – and it’s true that unlike previous generations, they are comfortable switching employers every few years in search of better opportunities. Recognizing this, Facebook encourages employees to routinely change roles within the company based on their strengths and career objectives. It’s not unusual for a worker to be hired for one job, and then quickly transition to another based on his or her initial performance. Paddy Underwood, 28, was hired as a lawyer on Facebook’s privacy team, but two years in, he decided he wanted to pivot from practicing law to building products, he told the Journal. He sat down with his managers, and they made the job transfer happen. Other employees are encouraged to switch roles based on their skill sets.

3. Grading on a curve

Instead of measuring employees’ performance against a static list of criteria, they are graded on a curve – i.e. individual performance is evaluated on how it stacks up against everyone else’s. This keeps even the brightest workers on their toes, and maintains a consistently high standard of work. For employees used to glowing performance reviews, an average rating (meaning they are working at the same level as their co-workers) can be “the worst thing that ever happened in their career,” Don Faul, Facebook’s former president of online operations, told the Journal.

Of course, Facebook’s management techniques won’t work at every company, or in every industry. The little value it places on titles may jar older employees, and the fast-paced, mercurial environment can lead to burn-out (which perhaps helps explain Facebook’s young median age). That said, the way Facebook – an incredibly successful company built by millennials, and largely run by them — caters to its employees’ desires and work-style is a useful template for any company looking to effectively manage millennials.

Article by:

Entrepreneur Staff

Age and Experience Don’t Matter. Mindset Does.

Age and Experience Don't Matter. Mindset Does.

Since the 1960s people have talked about "the generation gap," the difference in ideas, opinions and behaviors that separates older from younger people.

The divide narrows or widens from time to time, but it’s always there, and at the moment it seems to be cutting through the workplace in a particularly complex way: Very soon, four generations will be working together or living under the same roof.

With retirement disappearing as a concept for more and more mature professionals who are having to work longer than they intended to supplement their pension, there are fewer job opportunities for those who are younger. That’s led not just to higher levels of youth unemployment, but also of a sense of unfulfillment among greater numbers of professionals around the world who suffer from increasing levels of stress and lack of purpose in their work.

When the baby boomers (born from 1946 to the 60s) and generation X (those born in the 60s and 70s) do come together in the workplace with the much younger millennials (the connected generation of "digital natives" born in the 80s and 90s), there are often tensions.

It will be interesting to see the new and very real challenges and opportunities arising when all these groups are joined by those among generation Z (those born from the mid 1990s onwards), who have never known a life without super-fast communication and unlimited access to media technologies, smartphones and online shopping.

The baby boomers and some in gen X often perceive their younger counterparts as having an unjustified sense of entitlement, with no real work ethic, and unwilling to "pay their dues" by starting at the bottom and working their way up.

At the same time, younger employees see their seniors as intransigent, inflexible and no longer best equipped to make the right decisions. Generations Y and Z expect to have knowledge at their fingertips and the independence technology gives them to be able to work anywhere and for whom they choose. Highly transient and mobile, they expect immediate responses from others.

However, because they prefer to sit behind and communicate through the screens of their PCs, laptops and smartphones, their under-developed ability to communicate face to face could put them at a disadvantage when it comes to managing staff, making presentations and connecting with those in other generations.

Whatever the relative truth of the matter, this can make for a challenging mix.

For many in this generation war, the young seem to be winning so far, with the millennials squeezing out the baby boomers and even gen X'ers in a battle of salary cuts as companies, cash strapped after the recent downturn, seek to rein in spending.

However, while age and lifestyle preferences are often seen as the major dividing line between us, I believe there’s one that’s even more important — mindset, something that goes beyond age, gender, education, wealth and geography.

It is by focusing on mindsets and values that I believe we can transcend the traditional generational descriptions that so often seem to create division rather than harmony and unity.

I see mindset and attitude as the real differentiator of talent in our world. But while it is crucially important, it’s something that, as yet, very few companies consider when recruiting or selecting staff.

In my book Corporate Escape: the Rise of the New Entrepreneur, I coined the terms SUPER– (negative) Generation and SUPER+ (positive) Generation to separate the two opposing mindsets I see prevalent in organizations and society as a whole, with SUPER being an acronym for the characteristic way in which each sees and approaches the world.

So those in the SUPER–  Generation tend to be superficial, focused primarily on their possessions and external appearance. They have an ongoing need to purchase the latest gadgets and want whatever others have.

They are also unfulfilled, feeling "empty" because of an excessive focus on their appearance and "external" things, which don’t really satisfy their inner needs.

Consequently, with few real "anchors" in their lives, they feel left out and often become negative about the future. Without any sense of purpose or direction, this makes them pessimistic, as well as rather self-centered and egocentric. They believe the world is all about "them," so they’re rarely willing to take responsibility for their behavior and actions or take ownership for their own success.

And since all this makes their lives less than happy, they are restless, always searching for the next "new thing." Their world revolves around others and what is fashionable, superficial and temporary.

Unfortunately, a large percentage of those in any kind of work and experience fall well and truly into this category.

Then there are those who are members of that other club: the SUPER+ Generation.

These are individuals who don’t wait for things to happen, but who make them happen, which tends to make them more successful.

They aren’t frightened to stand out and be different, which means they are independent thinkers, often with an unconventional outlook and approach.

Driven to succeed, they are energetic and passionate about making a difference, which frequently comes through in their innately entrepreneurial approach to life, taking responsibility for their own actions.

Finally, they believe in making things happen through a collaborative approach, which is why they are relational, global thinkers who are able to see beyond "me" and "you" to "us."

As an entrepreneur, business owner or manager, who would you want more of on your side?

Those in then SUPER+ Generation I suspect, because it’s they who will drive companies and societal evolution forward. They are the leaders of tomorrow.

And since this fundamental division between generations goes largely unrecognized, businesses continue to employ based on other criteria — normally the traditional CVs and cost — a short-term approach that can leave mature professionals with plenty of knowledge and industry experience standing on the wrong side of the door. However, given increasingly volatile, uncertain and complex economies and global markets, if you really want to make things happen in the best way, experienced heads are often still needed alongside the energy and new perceptions of those who are younger. You are created to work with others, to collaborate and learn together, not to be in constant opposition.

The great thing is that at any moment you have the power to create the professional world you want to be part of. One in which where you come from, your age and gender, or and what you have done before is less important than your vision of what is possible.

When the future is created one step at the time, isn’t it time to see beyond the generations?

Author: Maite Baron
Multi-Award Winning Author,
International Speaker,
Co-Founder of
TheCorporateEscape.com

 

 

Coming Soon the Affiliate Program (Explained)

The Markethive Affiliate program is inspired by a similar program that Paypal used to expand the membership and develop recognition of their brand and their service. Starting out with just 20 people, their affiliate program started out and maintained a 7% growth daily. Which equates to doubling the membership base every 2 weeks. This is why we are building a similar program.

The Be The Alpha affiliate program for Markethive members illustrated:

Unlike Paypal, we do not have large venture capital, therefore we have decided to be generous in our affiliate commissions to inspire exponential growth. Our affiliate program pays up to 50% to qualified members from all of their front line advertising revenues. Advertising revenues come from banner ads, profile page upgrades, calendar promotions and news feed boosts. Additional revenues can be expected during the life of the company from technology expansions like the current revelation of integrated conference rooms.

We are mixing the affiliate program into an entrepreneur training and development process called the Be The Alpha program and the structural layout works like this.


   
FREE
Selected allows the member to access the system without the annoying popups pitching the program for 30 days. No capture page and no commissions.
  $25 PER MONTH
Selected the members Profile page activates to capture new memberships into the system as their children. Contributes $25 per month into their ad credits account. No commissions paid.
  $50 PER MONTH
Selected the members Profile page activates to capture new memberships into the system as their children. Contributes $100 per month into the their ad credits. 25% commissions paid.
         
         
   
$100 PER MONTH
Selected the members Profile page activates to capture new memberships into the system as their children. Contributes $300 per month into their ad credits account. 40% commissions paid.
  $2000 PER YEAR
Selected the members Profile page activates to capture new memberships into the system as their children. One time deposit of $4000 in Ad credits and contributes $300 per month for the year. 50% commissions paid.
  $5000 ONE TIME PAYMENT
One time deposit of $10,000 in Ad credits and contributes $200 per month for life of the company. 50% commissions paid. 5% company revenue shared with all FOUNDER members. Limited to 250 members.

The Be The Alpha affiliate program uses the parent | child terminology to define the relationship that develops when a new member registers via the Alpha Profile page.

Like software, we refer to the owner of the profile page when their profile page is upgraded to capture new Markethive memberships, as "parent" and the new members that sign up into the parents profile capture page as "children". This terminology lends itself to our description because the "parents" as mentors to their "children" inherit a certain responsibility to take a level of responsibility to assist their children to grow into competent parents themselves.

The program evolves or ascends from each level to a higher action. The first level, Trailblazer. is designed to give the new member 30 days rest from the constant default to the Alpha Promotion page found in the Home section of the platform. After 30 days that page will again begin to play the promotional video to upgrade your system every time the member logs in or navigates the home section where the News Feed is. We certainly do not want to annoy our members, however, we would like to keep them gently aware of the benefits awaiting them by upgrading.

In the same notion, new members are connected to a Parent, A Parent is an upgraded paid member ,as upgraded members only receive new membership registrations. And as the parent rises in rank and growth, there integration to their children increases and their schooling becoming greater and more responsible entrepreneurs grows. So here is the theory in a nutshell, when it comes to building responsible, effective proven ethical entrepreneurial leadership:


Be The Alpha” Entrepreneur program.

The very being and wanting to become an entrepreneur is a journey that begins in the heart and the soul. What is an entrepreneur and how do we know if we have what is called a calling? Defining exactly what an entrepreneur is, sometimes, it is easier to define what an entrepreneur is not.

What is not an Entrepreneur?

An Entrepreneur does not spam.  An Entrepreneur does not engage into a business opportunity just to make money or just to make a living. Entrepreneurs are not capitalist in that they do not exploit others or resources just to get rich. They do not lie, cheat and steal to get ahead or to just make a profit.

Time for a PSA (Public Service Announcement)
“Do not get me wrong here.  Capitalism as a political system versus socialism, communism, oligarchies, monarchies, dictatorships, etc. is a superior system. Capitalism as an economic system allows an open system made for free enterprise and it is in such a system Entrepreneurs flourish. However, being the very nature of Entrepreneurs, we can flourish in the darkest of times and it is the Entrepreneurs that push towards the light in all things such as they are.”

The characteristics of an Entrepreneur:

Entrepreneurs are leaders, "not managers". Innovators and visionaries with an endless supply of enthusiasm and connected to a resource of inner knowledge and ideas. Many potential entrepreneurs are inhibited and in bondage to the consistent worldly messages to conform, to get the job, become a cog, get a college education, go into debt and comply to the authoritative message.

Competent entrepreneurs walk in front and show others the way. They take on the hard to do, they lift the heavy obstacles, and like the Marines, are always first in and last out. Tom Sawyer is the proverbial entrepreneur, showing the crowd a master piece in the process of painting the fence faster and better than the crowd who gathered to watch.  It is awe that makes the crowd members pick up a brush and join in and inspired by Tom they stay involved through the entire process and keep recruiting others.

Entrepreneurs never take short cuts. They stand firm on ethics and imbibe a level of integrity others are attracted to and recognize. Entrepreneurs are natural born leaders. They don’t stop for nearly as many breaks or gather around and watch others. Entrepreneurs always hoe to the end of the row, even in heat, rain, storm or even when supper is calling.

Entrepreneurs rarely get fired. But they often get fired up. They will quit any job that asks them to do something they don’t believe in. But they will work at any job if the reason is strong enough or they have given their word.

Entrepreneurs are shepherds with a staff who call out with their voice, not sheep herders that ride horses with lots of smart dogs that nip at your heals.

Entrepreneurs know you need to be both a leader and a manager… in that order. They always start with a leader, and then find a manager.

They know a great leader is the ultimate solution to any problem. They pay ten to a thousand times more money for a great leader than a great manager… in a heartbeat.

Entrepreneurs begin to sing out when the song begins, because they know the other voices will soon blend in and hide the fact they are slightly off key.

Entrepreneurs seek out the one lagging beyond, find what makes them tick, then challenge them to keep up and to keep time.

This is what the “Be The Alpha” program is all about.

So you want success, you want to be entrepreneurial; you want to engage your dreams, be a leader and develop the skills to make this a reality. This is why we have developed this system.

You are attracted to the Markethive and decide to sign up. You are attracted to the movement, a vision bigger than you, a mission to change the world. We all know that the spirit of entrepreneurialism is dying in America. 

For the first time in America, new business starts are dropping despite the fact the population among those in ages between 25-55 historically the prime years for starting business is growing. Even more alarming is the rate of business formation has slowed, the pace of business closures, which had held steady over the previous decade, started to ascend in 2005 and spiked in 2008, according to data compiled by the Brookings Institute. Consequently, business deaths now outpace business births for the first time since researchers started collecting the data in the late 1970’s.

Read the article here

Therefore, the advancement, the expansion and the support of a growing base of Entrepreneurs almost takes on a religious zealousness here at Markethive.

Therefore the way we are developing our affiliate program. It has several aspects as to the why we are doing this. Primarily to drive our growth in revenues so we can reinvest back into the system as well as the mission, but even more important to start building a growing army of motivated, empowered competent entrepreneurs.

The Markethive system offers a portfolio of incredible, proprietary marketing systems that elsewhere would cost upwards of thousands of dollars a month. We are making it for free, for everyone, for life.  Our source of revenue is the advertisement, not monthly membership subscriptions or any MLM type of “hope and dreams” mentality.

The new subscriber is immediately introduced to the “Be The Alpha” program where entry is free and by entering, the constant default to the Alpha Promotion video is halted for 30 days. After 30 days it will begin its annoying constant playing again, reminding the active member to make a choice again.

That beginning entry is simply called Trailblazer. This is the new member's first intro to the process of becoming entrepreneurial in character, word and deed. This process will become more sophisticated as we go. The level will be alerted to the “parent”, it will be noted on the members profile, there level and a small icon will be associated next to or on their profile picture where ever that picture appears.

It should be expected that the “parent” would take interest in their children growing and making sure the child begin watching the motivational videos, attend the many weekly motivational orientations and groups, to begin the engagement into the culture of the Entrepreneur @ Markethive, so to speak.

Once this journey begins, the system, the mentoring, the motivational orientations, the “parent” and the company will gently persuade the Trailblazer to upgrade to Voyager.

Voyager is no different than any other advertising program in Markethive, other than it actually delivers greater value. The entry level monthly fee of $25 per month, as all of our Alpha affiliate programs, always provide an equal or greater result in ad credits. As well, the Voyager platform gives the membership a Profile (capture) page, so all traffic sent to the members profile page, should a registration occur, that prospect is locked in as the “child” to the Voyager, that prospect becomes the Voyagers lead and that prospect also receives the Voyagers autoresponders and entered into the group of choice in the Profile page configuration. Voyagers do not receive advertising commissions; rather they are concentrated on building a database of “children”. As the population of children grow, with mentoring from the Markethive culture, support from the parent to the Voyager and realization that this group of children are starting to rise in the ranks from Trailblazer, to Voyagers themselves, the next step is simply to understand and the next logical action in the learning curve of the evolution of the developing entrepreneur is upgrading to Navigator.

Navigator is not really much different than Voyager, other than you progress to gathering even more advertising credits and start receiving commissions from your “children’s” advertising purchase’s.  The monthly cost doubles from $25 per month to $50 per month.  However the monthly ad credits quadruples. In other words, your $50 per month contribution earns you $100 in ad credits. But it also opens up to start receiving 25% commissions on all your children’s money transactions within Markethive. All transactions, because all transactions are only for advertising in Markethive, everything else has no cost to it now or ever. Even conference rooms (we just developed our own working code for those) will be totally free. They will have limits on number of seats until you sponsor ads in them. And the more ads you sponsor into the conference rooms, the larger rooms you get, as your organization of children grow and they become more sophisticated as growing entrepreneurs, the greater the incentive you have to upgrade. And upgraded levels also create greater ad credits that can be used to increase your business exposures, larger ad campaigns, and greater financial security. This in turn helps you redirect your priorities and focus, moving you further into the realm of becoming an Alpha Entrepreneur and the next step, becoming an Alpha Commander. Definition: “A great leader who has nurtured his team should be able to withdraw his presence and return to find his well-oiled machine maintaining the same momentum as before he left. A great commander is judged by his absence. A great business leader creates a system, a culture and a structure capable of growing even without his day to day involvement”.

Commander starts looking forward into the system, knowing his organization of children are now driving along from the foundations laid by the commander’s actions and the support culture that is genetic in Markethive. The monthly fee now doubles again ($100 per month), but triples the amount of advertising credits ($300 per month) and pays 40% commissions on all children's purchases. By now the Commander is starting to incorporate advertising as well as a firm command with the “Campaigns” section (the most sophisticated tool set in Markethive).

A great commander is judged in his absence.
What many entrepreneurs fail to recognize is that leadership is not so much about the leader – but more so about the ones who are being led. The key to great leadership is not to teach others to become reliant on your guidance – but rather guide others towards self-sufficiency.  A great leader who has nurtured his team should be able to withdraw his presence and return to find his well-oiled machine maintaining the same momentum as before he left. A great commander is judged by his absence. A great business leader creates a system, a culture and a structure capable of growing even without his day to day involvement.
Faisel Butt

Removing yourself from the workplace in order to see the big picture is a vital part of ensuring everything is working correctly.  A painter will spend days working away on detailed scenes on his artistic canvas.  But to fully see the effectiveness of his efforts he must take a few steps back and judge the work in its entirety.

Like the painter, this constant waltz between micro and macro is the state of mind the modern entrepreneur must adopt in our fast changing world. The creation of new projects and ideas is an artistic process that cannot be undertaken while you remain submerged in the chaos of the trenches. Hands-on management helps you with the day-to-day running – but who is orchestrating the business’s next stage of evolution?  Founders and business leaders, however, cannot simply be strategists – they need to have that unique ability to swiftly "deep dive" into the trenches when required but then elevate back up to the "aerial view" to strategically navigate the way forward.  A great entrepreneur must have the vision and reflectiveness of an artist but the agility and versatility of a military commander.  That's probably why they are such a rare breed.

The Commander’s level starts to fill in the gaps of becoming an Alpha Entrepreneur and the Commander starts to see the massive benefits taking the next quantum step to Alpha Odyssey. After all, the Entrepreneur can leave for a time and his/her team and return to a well-oiled enterprise.

Odyssey, what a strange term yet, conveys the final stretch to your great adventure.  You are learning to accept the fate of your quests. As Tyler Perry says, " All you can do is plant your seed in the ground, water it … and believe’ – that and the Grace of God is the key to success " As you have moved forward in the “Hive” surrounded by your peers and mentors, you have learned that 100% focus works. To never stop believing in your mission, to have 100% dedicated conviction towards your dreams. You are discovering, nothing is impossible with faith.

You are now Alpha Odyssey, your $2000 contribution for a full year of service immediately pays back instant dividends with $4000 in ad credits and another $300 per month for the full year equaling a massive $7,600 plus you are now in the upper echelon of entrepreneurial leadership and can be expected to be invited to host Markethive conferences and mentoring sessions. You are now at the top of the commissions receiving 50% of all revenue generated by your children. By this time you can expect to be leading a significant organization of children who are looking to you as a leader and mentor in that sphere of internet. Now you have options. Build a networked business, develop a crowd founding organization. Create a powerful social and seo network. You have become an Alpha Entrepreneur.

For the Early Movers, Alpha Founder: Alpha Founder is a limited opportunity to 250 members, to be a limited partner with Markethive and share in the 5% of the revenue pool. Your $5000 contribution gets you $10,000 in ad revenue as well as $200 per month towards ad revenue. You also receive 50% of all your children’s ad purchases and a share of 5% of the company’s revenue pool. This is for the life of the company. Become the elite Alpha Entrepreneur. Alpha Founder.

Welcome to social movement that will build the army of Entrepreneurs that will change the world!

Thinking Outside the Box by Moving Into One

Thinking Outside the Box by Moving Into One

Now this is the Entrepreneur @ Work!

OAKLAND, Calif. — This summer, the median rent for a one-bedroom in San Francisco’s cityscape of peaked Victorians soared higher than Manhattan’s, sent skyward by a housing shortage fueled in part by the arrival of droves of newcomers here to mine tech gold.

And so, as the story of such cities goes, the priced-out move outward — in New York City, to Brooklyn and, increasingly, to Queens. For San Franciscans, the rent refuge is here in Oakland, where the rates are increasing as well — so much so that young professionals are living in repurposed shipping containers while the homeless are lugging around coffinlike sleeping boxes on wheels.

These two improvised housing arrangements have emerged in an industrial pocket of Oakland where the median rent has gone up by 20 percent over the past year. One, in a warehouse, is called Containertopia, a community of young people who have set up a village of 160-square-foot shipping containers like ones used in the Port of Oakland. Each resident pays $600 a month to live in a container, which can be modified with things like insulation, glass doors, electrical outlets, solar panels and a self-contained shower and toilet.

Heather Stewart at Containertopia in Oakland, Calif. Ms. Stewart created Containertopia, a village of 160-square-foot shipping containers, with Luke Iseman. Credit Jim Wilson/The New York Times

 

Containertopia was started last year by Luke Iseman, 32, and Heather Stewart, 30, who were then a couple. For Mr. Iseman, who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School and works in technology — most recently developing automated systems for watering plants — container living has been a social experiment in stripping down to the basics, one that he hopes to teach others to replicate.

“If we can do it in one of the highest-cost places in the world,” he said, “people can do this anywhere.”

Just outside the warehouse doors is another community, residing, too, in containers of a sort. Here, the homeless live in dwellings made by a local artist named Gregory Kloehn, set on wheels and made for the streets. Each is about eight feet long and tall enough for a person to sit up in.

“It doesn’t fit our mind-set of what a home is,” said Mr. Kloehn, 44, who began creating and giving away the portable homes, which are made of recycled material, in 2011. Oakland has about 3,000 homeless people, according to the East Oakland Community Project, a nonprofit organization that helps house people who live on the street; San Francisco has about 6,700.

Mr. Kloehn has made about 40 of the cheerily painted rolling boxes, coaxing people to leave their cardboard or tarp shanties on the streets.

Gregory Kloehn, an artist, uses recycled materials to build containers, about eight feet long and on wheels, that people can live in. He gives them away to homeless people in Oakland, Calif. Credit Jim Wilson/The New York Times

 

“In this city, with all its money, within it there is another layer: these nomadic people who are living off our garbage,” he said.

Containertopia and Mr. Kloehn’s mobile shelters draw from the tiny house movement, a shift to a more ascetic way of living that has inspired entire microhome villages in places like Olympia, Wash., and Madison, Wis., as well as isolated examples in countless backyards. Such residences are embraced by the ecologically and social-justice minded, but are often fought by local governments; they often do not comply with building codes or are plopped in areas where they should not be.

But that is where the similarities between the homeless dwellings and the shipping containers end. Though they are on the same block, they are worlds apart.

Ms. Stewart and Mr. Iseman initially set Containertopia in an abandoned lot in the area, which they purchased for $425,000 with several friends. They were forced out this spring after neighbors complained. (The lot is not zoned for residences; for now, the owners grow vegetables there while they decide what to do with it.)

Then, with 12 of their friends and a forklift, Mr. Iseman and Ms. Stewart moved the container homes indoors to a warehouse. Mr. Iseman’s container, painted azure inside, cost about $12,000 to make habitable, with a lofted bed and a picture window carved into one flank. Ms. Stewart is still at work on hers, spackling drywall and carving a kitchen countertop from a redwood board she milled from a giant trunk.

Norris Reed with his tiny home in Oakland, Calif., created by the artist Gregory Kloehn.  The fireplace is the door. Credit Jim Wilson/The New York Times

 

The shift from house to container dwelling has made them reprioritize almost everything. Ms. Stewart quit her job in digital design to manage Containertopia and sold most of her possessions.

“I can work an office job and pay my rent every month and be stressed about not being able to do anything else, or I can live in a ridiculous warehouse,” she said. “The choice is obvious.”

Mr. Kloehn, the artist, is best known for his own container home, a Dumpster turned studio apartment on the lot of an arts collective in Red Hook, Brooklyn, where he spends part of the year. His other home is a studio in Oakland in the same industrial neighborhood as Containertopia.

Several years ago, Mr. Kloehn became fascinated with how homeless people appropriated what few resources they had — namely, other people’s trash — to create shelters. He decided to do the same, cobbling the small dwellings together with an artist’s skill.

“I’m just kind of ripping a page from the homeless people’s books,” he said. “They’ve been making homes out of this stuff for a long time.”

Gregory Kloehn with one of his “tiny house” creations in Oakland, Calif., for people “who are living off our garbage.” Credit Jim Wilson/The New York Times

 

Another artist, Elvis Summers, started making similar tiny homes for the homeless around Los Angeles. But that city determined those homes were illegal; many of the structures were moved onto private property before sanitation workers could remove them from the streets.

Mr. Kloehn says that cracking down on the boxes is misguided. If the box homes were banned, “would they be in an apartment?” he asked of the dwellers. “Would they be in a condo? Or would they be nowhere?”

In Oakland, the portable houses have been largely tolerated. Several residents said they were occasionally asked by the police to wheel them elsewhere, but were otherwise left alone.

A block from Mr. Kloehn’s studio, and around the corner from Containertopia, sits one of his homes for the homeless, brightly colored with a trompe l’oeil paint job that makes it look like a microsize suburban home.

“This house is a blessing,” the woman living in it said. She declined to give her name because she said she was ashamed she lived on the streets, having once had a steady job and a real home.

She added, “This is my way of trying to get back to how I used to be.”

Reprinted credit goes to Sarah Maslin Nir


From time to time an article that showcases the true spirit of the Entrepreneur comes to my attention. This article truly shows how Entrepreneurialism serves the common brothers and sisters who are truly in need. It is not about profit, but it is about serving a higher calling, which in turn rewards with profit.

 

Thomas Prendergast
CMO Markethive

The 5 Core Characteristics of Great Entrepreneurs

I’ve worked with and mentored a lot of entrepreneurs over the years. And whilst we all love to analyze the theories and strategies that we can learn from others to make things work better in your business as for an entrepreneur, we often forget that there are also character traits that we could look to develop as well. You can read all the books in the world, but theories are useless unless you learn to adopt some of these characteristics:

Consistent boldness

 

Most entrepreneurs are naturally a little ballsy, but it’s not enough just to come up with a great idea or to start a business — you have to be consistently bold enough to stand by your idea, to keep pushing forward even when it seems like you’re making a monumental waste of effort, and when everyone around you just doesn’t see a happy ending. You also need to be bold enough to realize when you are stuck on a dead end road and it’s time to do something different.

 

You also have to be bold in putting yourself out there. Many people avoid doing this because they don’t want to feel sleazy or like they’re hard selling people, but unless you can get over this, nobody’s going to know about you or care about you.

 

Finally, you have to be bold in asking for what you want. Of course it’s totally terrifying to ask someone for something that you really want, but you will be amazed by how often people actually do help if you tell them how and if you ask the right way. For instance, I needed to raise money to build a vision called Markethive, an online ecosystem of sorts for Entrepreneurs. So I gathered up a couple hundred of my closet friends and associates, showed them my presentation and I raised $400,000 in 2 weeks to build the dream.  But because I was bold enough to put myself out there and because I asked in a way in a way that appealed to them, I was able to raise the money to make it work. A good sense of humor always helps too!

Speed

 

I know I’m surprising absolutely no one when I say that things move fast as an entrepreneur. To be a great entrepreneur, you’ve got to be able to work fast and still keep the quality of your output high.

 

That’s not to say that you can’t do great things if you like to think or act more slowly — but if you are like that, then you’ll probably need to get a partner or a group that will balance you out and force you to act. Otherwise you’ll likely stagnate.

Flexibility

 

A lot of people mix up being flexible with being flighty. I’m not saying that you should just dabble in things or totally scrap a project at the first sign of trouble. You need to be focused and unshakeable on your big goals, but in parallel with that, you have to be able to be flexible with how things unfold day to day.

 

Being too rigid will cause you to lose a ton of opportunities that come up along the way, because you will be too focused on following your planned steps instead of recognizing opportunities that could get you to your end goal even better. So learn to pivot, and be flexible when you need to.

Perspective

 

Having a sense of perspective is absolutely critical, because working as an entrepreneur usually feels a little crazy and because you’re going to fail hideously at least once. If you get so wrapped up in what you’re doing that you can’t take a step back, see the humor in situations, or dispassionately look at your failures to see what you can learn from them, then this probably isn’t the path for you.

Resilience

 

Finally, you’ve absolutely got to be resilient, certainly in the face of failure, but also just in terms of daily life as an entrepreneur. It can be really hard when you’re working for yourself — people don’t really get what you do every day and sometimes they might even think you’re just ‘messing about’. Resilience is what keeps you going, both when you get hit with a big failure or just the everyday crisis, so it’s essential that you learn how to bounce back.

Seeking the motivational quotient

Here is a riddle. Are you, like me, open for a good mentoring session, a video, a speaker an event? Someone or an event that would accelerate your momentum, push you forward to lose that extra weight, discipline you to achieve that goal, turn you on to be extra productive?

Yet the moment comes and then life interrupts, focus changes, and you are right back where you were, quietly frustrated, living mediocre results, and feeling just a bit more depressed and sleeping in just a bit more?

Do you find yourself medicating your lack luster life on Facebook, tweaking on twitter? Mindlessly jabbering with others on Skype? Playing video games knowing deep inside your life is being wasted away?

Here at Markethive, motivation is consistent, it is the culture here, we are entrepreneurs. We share motivational content, help each other. Holding each other accountable, a place filled with 100s of excellent motivational videos, groups and tools that support the eccentricness of the entrepreneur.

Here we are home. We are square pegs in a round world.