Tag Archives: Cryptocurrency

Crypto Airdrops Effective Marketing Tool And Potential ICO Replacement

Crypto Airdrops – Effective Marketing Tool, And Potential ICO Replacement

Crypto Airdrops – Effective Marketing Tool, And Potential ICO Replacement

One of the biggest challenges in the cryptocurrency space is to raise people’s awareness of your project, especially when it is time to raise capital or to boost the growth of the network. Nowadays, many projects rely on increasing their brand awareness using traditional mediums, such as paid YouTube influencers, paid-content writers, paid Twitter accounts, or simply by conducting huge marketing campaigns and questionable teasers.

The problem is that most of these marketing schemes are illegal as tokens are considered financial assets by many institutions such as the SEC, which warned influencers and celebrities that they are violating securities laws, such as the anti-touting provision of the federal securities laws, by promoting ICOs without disclosing the nature and amount of their compensation for any type of endorsement. 

For these reasons, token airdrops seem to have become the new cryptocurrency marketing craze, with many projects deciding to use this strategy to distribute their tokens to the public. For instance, NNS, Neo Name Service, decided to airdrop 1% of its total supply to NEO holders on June 27th, and a dozen projects evolving within the EOS ecosystem decided to follow the same strategy (Most EOS airdrops can be found on EOSDrops.io)

What Is An Airdrop?

An airdrop occurs when coins are deposited into someone’s wallet, without the person having paid anything, almost out of thin air. In many cases, to be the recipient of an airdrop, the only requirement is to have some coins from the hosting blockchain of the project stored in a private wallet. For instance, if the token being airdropped is an ERC-20 coin, then holding a certain amount of ETH is sufficient to be eligible for the airdrop. The same idea works from project evolving on the NEO, Stellar (XLM), or Icon (ICX) blockchains. Sometimes, and most often than not, other non-financial requirements also have to be met, such as subscribing to social media feeds or completing KYC. “Airdrops combine the best of paid referral programs with stock options. Potential users get paid for joining or using the network and have the potential upside if the network increases in value.”

Why Do Projects Airdrop Their Tokens For Free?

The reason behind airdrops is not simply to give the public free coins, but rather as part of a more elaborate corporate strategy. First and foremost, airdrops are used to increase awareness around a token, which might lead to an increase in the token value and to the creation of a network effect. This marketing strategy plays on a cognitive bias known as the endowment effect – suggesting that individuals value something higher if they own it. Moreover, like most types of advertisement, airdrops are used to plant a “seed” into users’ psyches. The aim is that the next time users see the ticker of the coin they have been airdropped, even months later, they will have the reflex to stop and be more likely to click on the ticker to know what is happening to the coin, even if only to see the current price.

Secondly, airdrops are a way to avoid regulatory scrutiny, as ICOs are currently in a grey area in some jurisdictions (the US) or completely banned (China, Korea). Therefore, projects are instead deciding to raise money from institutional investors and airdrop the rest as a way to allow users to get their hands on the token. Examples of companies using airdrops to this extent are Banyan Network and Polymath. Most companies which decided not to conduct public ICOs, are either China-based or evolve in the US financial industry (for an extensive review on this point, we suggest reading this article).

Are Airdrops Effective Marketing Tools?

OmiseGo (OMG)

OmiseGo conducted the first airdrop of this kind and amplitude on September 4th – distributing 5% of the total issuance of OMG token to every ETH address, with a minimum balance of 0.1 ETH. The purpose of requiring a minimum wallet balance was to avoid sending tokens to phantom wallets and ensure that real users received the OMG tokens.  The airdrop enabled each ETH holder, by providing them with a share of the 5%, proportional to their share of the total circulating supply of Ether.

According to the team, the aim of the airdrop was to allow the token to be distributed as widely as possible, allowing for true decentralisation of the platform, to ultimately increase its network security. However, the statistics demonstrate that the aim of the Omise team might not have been purely holistic, but might have been part of a grand marketing scheme.    

On the chart below from Google Trends, you can see that a surge in search interest related to OmiseGo occurred during the days of the airdrop, reaching a peak close to the end of 2017, and dropping to a tenth of the search interest in June 2018. Most websites such as CoinDesk, CoinTelegraph, and much of the Twittersphere spoke about the airdrop, leading to many people wondering what the project was about, and increasing OMG brand awareness.

Ontology (ONT)

In contrast with OmiseGo, Ontology did not perform a public token sale but raised its capital uniquely from private investors. Rather than conducting an ICO to provide the crypto community with the ONT tokens, the company decided to launch 3 rounds of airdropping possibilities, with the first being worth $8,000 at ONT all-time high.

The first phase involved the subscription to the Ontology Newsletter, coupled with a KYC in January 2018, with as a reward for doing so, 1,000 ONT being distributed by email address. The second was to people attending the NEO DevCon by giving them 500 ONT. Finally, Ontology being from the same mother-house than NEO, AntChain, the company decided to give 100 million ONT (10%) to the NEO council, which decided to pass on 20 million of them to its community at a ratio of 0.2 ONT for each NEO owned.

The snapshot of the third phase of the airdrop occurred on March 1st, leading to the all-time peak in Google searches for the term Ontology. As in the case of OmiseGo, the airdrop has been covered in pretty much every crypto news outlet, meaning crowd awareness was at a high. Additionally, the token having been sold at $0.20 during the pre-sale, privates investors already realised a 40x return on their investments.

Tron (TRX)

Now, let’s take a look at Tron (TRX), and its PR machine and CEO, Justin Sun. On April 27th the team decided to airdrop 30 million TRX ($1.7 million equivalent) to Ethereum users having a balance of over 1 ETH (as of April 20) in their wallet. Unlike OMG, which decided to airdrop amounts proportional to the holding of ETH, or Ontology which gave everyone the same amount of ONT, Tron decided to credit each account with a random amount of TRX between 10 and 100. 

The Tron foundation has been clear that the reason for the airdrop was to market the Tron platform which was set to launch a few days after the airdrop, as their stated motives were to increase awareness around TRX and allow people to use these TRX to vote for the supernodes. However, unlike for the two examples mentioned above, the airdrop did not result in a drastic increase in Google search interest. The cause could be simply that Tron was omnipresent in social media since January, meaning people were already aware of an incoming airdrop, or as this is the first airdrop that took place squarely in the middle of the current bear market we find ourselves in, so overall interest in cryptocurrency has led to this lack of interest in Tron’s airdrop.

PolyMath (POLY)

Lastly, let’s take a look at Polymath, which in the same way as Ontology raised funds only from private investors, and did not conduct a public ICO. In a few words, the project sold 12.9 million POLY to private investors in their presale and decided to airdrop 10 million POLY to the blockchain community instead of executing an ICO. However, unlike all the projects above, which targeted the users of a particular platform, Polymath decided to allow anyone to subscribe to the airdrop, regardless of their holdings. 

Unsurprisingly, the project being fundamentally interesting, the team received more than 40,000 applications and demanded that each airdrop applicant complete a KYC and AML screening, to ensure that the tokens were airdropped to real users, rather than bots. All the people which completed the procedure received 250 POLY, worth $165 at the time of writing and $400 at the token’s all-time high.

Similarly to the other projects, besides Tron, the marketing scheme worked, as the search interest for Polymath reached its all-time high by the 10th of January, the deadline to apply to the airdrop. The airdropping strategy from a PR perspective is extremely effective, no matter the coin, the way the company decided to raise capital (public, or private), nor the distribution mechanism.  In all examples cited above, all coins show a spike in Google search interests – demonstrating that airdropping is an effective marketing tool.

Which Impact Do Airdrops Have On Token Price?

You might expect that airdrops automatically lead to selloffs. However, things are a little bit more complicated than that. In the case of Ontology (ONT), the data clearly shows that the airdrops led to a continuous increase in the token’s value. This might be explained by the fact that as the project was not traded prior to the airdrop; therefore, no price action prior to the airdrop occurred which would have allowed a buy the rumor, sell the news type pattern. Additionally, due to the token being highly anticipated by the cryptocurrency community, the project being from the same house as NEO, many decided to keep hold of their airdrop tokens.

In the Case of OmiseGo (OMG) the story is quite different. The token was tradeable long before the airdrop, and therefore people being airdropped OMG tokens might not have been interested in receiving them, thus selling their tokens, resulting in a cascading effect. This demonstrates that from a price standpoint, it might be important to investigate whether the target audience to receive the airdrop are going to be interested in holding the coin. In our opinion, giving airdrops to people who are uninterested in a project might not be the best strategy as it might become bad publicity, leading to even true holders being exasperated.

For Tron, as for its Google search movement, it is hard to know what the impact of the airdrop was, given the fact that several other pieces of news such as the mainnet release were given in the same period. Nevertheless, since the airdrop occurred, we can see that the token price has been steadily declining, with some sporadic upswing movements, coinciding with the overall crypto market movements – leading us to believe that the airdrop had indeed no particular effect to TRX as a whole

In Conclusion

Airdrops appear to be a highly effective tool to raise awareness of a project. Additionally, many projects see airdrops as a way to create a network effect, which is highly important in the blockchain space, where network security is proportionally related to the diversification of holdings. Needless to say, for an airdrop to be successful, it needs to have an extremely strong community. A community that believes in the coin will continue to promote it over a longer period of time and won’t sell off as soon as the distribution is carried out.

We see that both tokens, ONT and POLY, completed a private sale but no ICO – meaning that airdrops might become a good strategy for VCs to invest, as well as to provide an exit option. As stressed before, regulatory frameworks surrounding ICOs are highly uncertain, leading to higher regulatory risks. Thus, VCs might be reluctant to invest in projects undertaking a public sale, and the airdrop solution enables them to bypass these. Moreover, by not conducting an ICO, investors have the possibility to opt for reduced vesting and lock-up periods – allowing them to have higher liquidity on their holdings and to sell their positions if wanted.

The problem is, given that the airdrop method seems to be increasingly used, blockchain users might find themselves with increasing numbers of coins in their wallets which they could find themselves wanting to get rid of quickly. This problem has been pinpointed by Brayton Williams of Boost VC, who told CoinDesk that issuers could do a better job at targeting a relevant audience, rather than sending tokens to all addresses of a blockchain. For instance, issuers could airdrop tokens based on geography, demographics, job, or other factors, to cultivate the best market for the future of the platform.

The author succinctly describes the different kinds of online influencers, and how airdrops could capitalise on their reach, leading to airdrops reaching the right people who might have an interest in specific tokens, as well as referring them to their friends and further audience. For instance, an energy network evolving in a certain country would have no value to users living outside the said country, while a well-targetted airdrop to people living in the area might lead to a genuine interest in the project. The author of the text mentioned above envisions AI-driven tools, which won’t scan blockchains, or ask for manual inputs in order to receive the airdrops, but will instead look for data telling us which addresses are owned by which kind of people.

We believe that airdrops are here to stay and will become a big part of companies’ user acquisition schemes, and being able to market these will be increasingly important. However, despite being highly effective right now, as more projects turn toward this strategy, the effectiveness is likely to diminish – meaning that new marketing schemes, as well as more accurate targeting will need to be used. 

Article Produced By
Jacek Bastin

Jacek graduated with an M.A. in Finance from the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics. He lived in Europe and Asia, and always loved to dig into papers and research projects to really understand the key drivers and trends. He’s passionate about blockchain’s business application, the sharing economy, and FinTech.

TP

Bermuda Government Approves First ICO Under New Regulatory Regime

Bermuda Government Approves First ICO Under New Regulatory Regime

The government of Bermuda has awarded the first certification

for an Initial Coin Offering (ICO) under the island nation’s new regulatory regime for crypto and blockchain business, the country’s only daily newspaper, the Royal Gazette reports Oct. 18. According to the Royal Gazette, the Minister of National Security Wayne Gaines — whose office oversees ICT policy and innovation — announced that fintech company Uulala was awarded certification by the Bermudan government today at the Bermuda Executive Forum in Miami. In July, the Premier and Minister of Finance of Bermuda David Burt introduced new regulations on ICOs to the lower house of the country’s Parliament, the House of Assembly. The new guidelines require ICO issuers to provide detailed information about “all persons involved with the ICO.”

Issuers must also disclose a review of the project, detailing key aspects of the product or service such as the market audience, financing system, the amount of money that is planned to be raised, and technical aspects associated with software and blockchain specifications. The Royal Gazette reports that Uulala aims to improve financial inclusion of unbanked and underbanked people by providing financial services. The firm has reportedly developed a decentralized peer-to-peer network “to load cash into the digital economy.” Once funds are deposited, users purportedly have access to a virtual MasterCard, with which they can participate in e-commerce, as well as pay bills or send cross-border payments.

The company’s CEO Oscar Garcia told the Royal Gazette that Uulala aims to raise $50 million dollars in its token sale, and has already raised $10 million privately. Garcia noted the country’s thorough regulatory standards; it reportedly took four months for the firm to get approval for its license. Despite the wait, Garcia said: “Bermuda is known as a financial hub and it is very forward thinking on blockchain and fintech… They have a reputation of being excellent regulatory stewards and we thought that would be a better fit for us than a jurisdiction where we could say we’re good, they’d believe us and give us approval in three weeks.”

Bermuda has been cultivating a friendly regulatory environment for fintech, crypto, and blockchain-related business over the course of the past year. In addition to the aforementioned regulations, the country also began to amend the Banking Act in order to establish a new class of bank to render services to local fintech and blockchain organizations.The government has also signed memoranda of understanding (MoUs) with several blockchain and crypto-related companies to both promote the industry in Bermuda and create jobs for the local population.

Article Produced By
Aaron Wood

Aaron Wood is an editor at Cointelegraph, with a background in energy and economics. He keeps an eye on Blockchain's applications in building smarter and more equitable energy access globally.

https://cointelegraph.com/news/bermuda-government-approves-first-ico-under-new-regulatory-regime

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Cryptocurrency Airdrops and Bounty Campaigns Face SEC Hammer

Cryptocurrency Airdrops and Bounty Campaigns Face SEC Hammer

Cryptocurrency Airdrops and Bounty Campaigns Face SEC Hammer

The regulatory scrutiny over ICOs has led to the arrival of token “airdrops,

or free tokens in exchange for a few marketing efforts. However, a recent ruling by the SEC may end this augmenting form of generating hype for many cryptocurrency projects in the U.S.

SEC Not Impressed

A U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing, dated Aug. 14, unveiled digital asset startup Tomahawk has received a $30,000 fine and a lifetime ban for allegedly employing “fraudulent marketing techniques” to amp up its fundraising efforts. A cease-and-desist order was later made public and cryptocurrency communities were quick to note a key detail of the SEC’s order: “Free” tokens were considered securities.

Tomahawk’s token issuance was said to violate Sections 5(a) and 5(c) of the Securities Act by “selling TOM tokens in the absence of a registered statement.” The court highlighted Tomahawk’s use of bounty campaigns and other marketing activities were “designed to foster the company’s economic interests” in addition to potentially causing market manipulation for its tokens. The absence of regulations means cryptocurrency entrepreneurs have been offering airdrops and bounty campaigns immune to security laws.

However, the filing states quite the contrary:

“On July 27, 2017, in response to the Commission’s DAO Report, Tomahawk published an article online titled ‘Tomahawkcoin ICO Adjusting to the SEC, by Legally Avoiding Them.’ That article incorrectly stated that Tomahawk’s ICO would be exempt from securities regulation because the Company was abandoning its plan to be quoted on the OTC market.”

Airdrops to be Illegal Soon?

Some crypto-enthusiasts ascertain the SEC’s issue is not cryptocurrencies, but the wayward process of token distribution. In this regard, Mashable reported on blockchain-based ride-sharing application Juno in 2017, describing the company’s enterprising reward of digital “shares” to riders using the platform.

Needless to say, the SEC stepped in to change the company’s core business ideals, putting in a formal request to shift from a digital share-rewards system to a cash-based incentive process. Moving forward–now that token issuers and ICOs are viewed as taboo by the U.S. lawmakers–it is expected that airdrops and bounty campaigns face comparable legal action and certain levels of scrutiny. The airdrop case weakens when blockchain entrepreneurs themselves describe the process in a satirical manner. Matthew Roszak of

Bloq said:

“In certain ways, people are getting free lottery tickets. There will be a tsunami of airdrops this year.”

Article Produced By

Shaurya Malwa

Post-mining his first bitcoins in 2012, there was no looking back for Shaurya Malwa. After graduating in business from the University of Wolverhampton, Shaurya ventured straight into the world of cryptocurrency and blockchain. Using a hard-hitting approach to article writing and crypto-trading, he finds his true self in the world of decentralized ideologies. When not writing, Shaurya builds his culinary skills and trades the big three cryptocurrencies.

https://cryptoslate.com/cryptocurrency-airdrops-and-bounty-campaigns-face-sec-hammer/

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ICO portfolio is down by 66 in the first half of 2018 according to EY study

ICO portfolio is down by 66% in the first half of 2018, according to EY study

– 86% of tracked ICOs are below listing price; 30% lost substantially all their value

– ICOs claim to have raised US$15b in first half of 2018

– Top 10 ICOs listed in 2017 account for essentially all of the gains since issuance, with a majority in blockchain infrastructure

 In the first half of 2018, 86% of the leading initial coin offerings (ICOs)

that listed on a cryptocurrency exchange in 2017 are below their initial listing price and a portfolio of these ICOs is down by 66% since the peak of the market at the beginning of this year, according to a study from EY, Initial Coin Offerings: The Class of 2017 – one year later, that examined the ICOs' progress and investment returns. The study finds 30% have lost substantially all their value. There were gains among The Class of 2017 since their ICO, with most gains (99%) concentrated in the top 10 ICO tokens, the majority of which are in the blockchain infrastructure category.

The latest study follows an initial analysis in December 2017, when EY analyzed top ICOs representing 87% of the ICO funding last year. It found that a lack of fundamental valuation and due diligence by potential investors was leading to extreme volatility in ICO performance, which is still an ongoing issue. The study announced today found that ICOs claimed to have raised more than US$15b in 2018, compared with US$4.1b1 in 2017. However, EY found that only 29% (25) of the 2017 ICO projects that EY assessed have progressed to prototypes or working products – an increase of just 13% from December 2017. The remaining 71% have no offering in the market.  

Paul Brody, EY Global Innovation Leader, Blockchain, says:

"Despite the past year's hype around ICOs, there appears to be a significant lack of understanding around the risks and rewards of these investments. In addition, there is a disparity between those who invest in ICOs and the ICO project developers regarding the anticipated timelines of ROI. While ICOs are an entirely new way to raise capital, those participating should understand that there are factors – such as the slow progression toward working product offerings – that can introduce greater risk in ICO investing."

Utility tokens diminish in value

The study also examined the 25 companies with working products. Of those 25, seven were accepting payment in fiat currency as well as ICO tokens for their product offerings. As a result, customers can make purchases directly without buying the tokens issued in the ICO process, therefore bypassing the community of token holders and diminishing the value of the ICO tokens. In at least one case, an ICO company has abandoned ICO investors by no longer accepting their tokens (de-tokenizing).

Yuri Gedgafov, EY Tech Media and Telecom Center Leader, Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe & Central Asia, says: "So far, utility tokens aren't creating the engaged communities anticipated to coalesce around innovative ideas. In fact, many of the most successful ICOs are mired in litigation or conflict over broken promises and unexpected changes in business strategy with little to no rights for the ICO investor."

Ethereum platform remains dominant

Ethereum is the dominant platform and shows the highest activity among developers and on social media. While new platforms arise on a regular basis, there is no sign that the new ICO infrastructure projects have had any success in reducing the dominance of Ethereum as the industry's main platform. Brody says: "It's clear that due diligence and awareness of risk are more important than ever. The number of ICOs showing gains since listing on one of the leading crypto exchanges is so limited that it would have required exceptional good fortune or a visionary portfolio strategy to have made any gains investing in the 2017 ICOs. At the moment, the level of reward in this market doesn't look like it justifies the risks involved."

Note to Editors:

About the survey

The survey collected data on global projects that have conducted ICOs and performed a detailed analysis of the top 141 projects, which collected 87% of all ICO proceeds, following up on their performance between January 2018 and September 2018. The ICO market is unregulated; there is no single source of ICO data, reporting standards or generally accepted methodology. The findings are preliminary and based on public sources, and EY cannot always match the information given by these sources with the transactional data available on the public blockchain. We based our study on project websites, the most popular crypto exchanges, ICO trackers, data aggregators and interviews. The figures on ICO funding volumes (total and per project) are derived from open sources as of September 2018. The EY analysis is of 141 ICOs from 2017. We did not audit or confirm the data and it is subject to change.

Article Produced By
News from EY

A wide array of domestic and global news stories; news topics include politics/government, business, technology, religion, sports/entertainment, science/nature, and health/lifestyle. Articles that appear in this section may be written in English or other languages

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ico-portfolio-is-down-by-66-in-the-first-half-of-2018-according-to-ey-study-300734346.html

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Tips for holding a successful cryptocurrency airdrop campaign from a user perspective

Tips for holding a successful cryptocurrency airdrop campaign from a user perspective

I was reading an article from Payments Journal about

“Six Tips to Make Your Airdrop a Success” and thought I would write my little piece on the subject, from a user’s perspective.

Clarification #1: I’ve never run an ICO or airdrop campaign, so I have little understanding of technical aspect such as delivery of tokens, etc.

Clarification #2: Since starting my journey into my airdrop challenge I’ve signed up for around 15 airdrops, not to mention the ones that were scams and I could not complete for whatever reason.

What’s the point of this article:
Hopefully a company that is trying to run an airdrop reads this and improves their systems. Here are my tips from experience. Keep in mind that I can be wrong, and what I’m writing is purely my own opinion.

Switch from technical to simple

It’s easy to get caught up in the technical side of things when it comes to an airdrop. After all, the ICO and cryptocurrency realm is highly technical. The only problem with this notion is, that most people that sign up for airdrops probably learned about it from a friend, a forum post or some kind of website like mine.

These people can be complete crypto noobs and might have just recently bought their first piece of Bitcoin. They can understand basic instructions, but anything too technical and you are setting yourself up for a support nightmare. Even confusing instructions, weird website setups or strange forms is not a good idea. Make your airdrop user-friendly. It’s that simple.

Be clear on the following:

  • Exactly what a user needs to do to earn/receive airdrop tokens.
  • When will a user receive their tokens?
  • How much is each token worth or will it be on launch day?
  • What is your total airdrop token value?
  • When will you receive your tokens?

Confirm that your airdrop is not a scam

I hate signing up for an airdrop only to realize that it’s probably a complete scam and that I will never see those tokens in my wallet. Not only did I just waste time, but I probably just gave away my email address or entered personal details into a form that I rather would not have done, especially now that I know it’s a scam. There should be two parts to this:

Airdrop hosting

Host your airdrop on your main website! This is so simple, yet I can’t understand why so many ICO’s and blockchain projects try to collect user data via a Google form. It’s a complete joke. If your project is worth anything you should have a developer or designer that can create a page for your airdrop that can collect a form, have a user dashboard, etc. Lately, if an airdrop is not on a project’s website, I just don’t even bother filling out the form – OR READING ABOUT THE ICO. Isn’t that what it’s all about, to gain exposure?

Make sure information about the airdrop is shared across all your social media accounts. You can also go the extra mile and create a blog post on your company blog, Medium.com, and Steemit. Also, register as a company representative or the company yourself so that it looks legit. Please stop using some Bitcoin forum as your main portal for airdrop announcements. Sure, you can use it get people to promote it and announce bounties, but it has to be on your official website or point to it.

Scam prevention

Choose an employee or higher a virtual assistant to scour the web on a regular basis for people hosting a fake airdrop for your coin. There are just so many airdrop groups on Facebook, subReddits, etc. they would have to join to find out. You could even set up Google Alerts. Once a scam airdrop for your token or ICO is discovered, do whatever you can to close it down by reporting them to the platform they are on. Also, notify your subscribers to warn them of the scam.

Utilize as many social media platforms possible

If you care about gaining exposure for your ICO or blockchain project allow users to get the word out on multiple social media platforms and award them accordingly. This should include Facebook, Twitter, Medium, Reddit, Facebook groups (multiple share options), Steemit, YouTube – just to mention a few. Also don’t be skimpy with your reward system. The more you give, the more you get which takes me to my next point.

Reward users fairly

I’m okay with signing up for an airdrop that gives me $5 worth of tokens, but anything lower than that it starts to lose my interest. Also, if the airdrop is that low ($5), let’s face it $5 isn’t much, then please don’t expect the user to like and follow all 10 of your social accounts to get it.

And don’t let me get started on rewarding users $1-$2 per referral. Sure it might sound easy drive referrals to an airdrop page, but it isn’t always as simple as it sounds. Reward them accordingly. At least make an airdrop reward around $5. This way you will probably generate much more exposure and motive affiliates. Don’t be skimpy. I would much rather sign up AND READ ABOUT AN ICO when the airdrop gives you a good amount of tokens $10+.

Use technology to your advantage

This part admittedly I lack in experience and knowledge, but really if you have a team of expert developers working for you, surely you can figure it out. Use technology to track user signups, create a dashboard for easier tracking and confirmation of tasks completed for additional tokens, make it easy for users to see their token balance, etc.

The dashboard in my honest opinion is a great option. I love being able to log into my account and check my latest referral and airdrop statistics. Why can’t every airdrop campaign have this? You can even have a page on your website that details the number of airdrop tokens distributed and enable checking of wallet addresses etc to see how many tokens they will receive. EOSdac did something similar.

Check that everything works before launching

Why would you start an airdrop campaign only to have to tell users “we’re busy fixing the bugs, please be patient.” This is entirely unprofessional and just means you did not prepare correctly or test the airdrop. The simple solution is to test that everything is working before you launch the campaign.

Article Produced By
Crypto Coin Authority

http://www.thecryptocoinauthority.com/successful-airdrop-campaign-tips/

TP

Journalism Blockchain Startup Civil Cancels ICO Refunds Investors

Journalism Blockchain Startup Civil Cancels ICO, Refunds Investors

Crypto and blockchains startups, even those that hold great promise,

have sadly received the full brunt of 2018’s dismal market conditions, resulting in a widespread loss of clients and investment interest. For example, freshly-printed studies have revealed that Coinbase, widely regarded as this industry’s golden child, saw 80% of its U.S.-based customer base dissipate, resulting in a similar decrease in volumes. But most recently, on Tuesday, Civil, a promising blockchain-centric journalism startup, revealed that it had suffered a great setback.

Blockchain Startup Suffers Setback Amid Bear Market

While the conditions of 2018’s crypto winter are something that investors have grown accustomed to, Civil, an upstart blockchain startup, recently revealed that it had to formally cancel its initial coin offering (ICO) due to a lack of interest. For those who missed the memo, Civil’s raison d’être, if you will, is to revolutionize how digital journalism is managed from the ground-up. When it was founded in 2017, the company’s top brass envisioned a “new economy for journalism,” with many of the firm’s co-founders visualizing a series of platforms that brought change to this age-old industry.

However, ambitions don’t come without a cost. And in the case of Civil, that cost was one of a monetary variety. So while the firm initially saw a $5 million seed investment comes its way from ConsenSys, the Google of the blockchain world, Civil still craved capital. More specifically, the startup remained hell-bent on its plans to raise a minimum $8 million via an ICO of its CVL Ethereum-based tokens. But now, after the company’s one-month-long, long-awaited Civil Token ICO has finally elapsed, it is apparent that the startup overstated demand for its ICO, missing its soft cap by $6.5 million dollars. As reported by TechCrunch, although the firm’s head was in the clouds, in the end, only 1,012 investors purchased $1,435,491 worth of CVL tokens.

Seeing that it missed its soft cap by millions, Civil has sadly announced that it will be providing compensation to all participants of its ICO, with refund transactions being slated to be sent by October 29th. In a testament to the resilience of crypto innovators, who will stop at nothing to achieve the improbable, Civil has since revealed that it isn’t ready to shutter its blinds and close its doors. In fact, in a status update, Matthew Iles, the founder and CEO of the startup, alluded to the fact that his firm had learned from its mistakes, immediately divulging plans for a “much simpler token sale.”

Attempting to turn the unfortunate situation on its head, Iles adding that “Civil isn’t going anywhere [and is] here to say” due to a $3.5 million investment from ConsenSys, who seems to be a big believer in the startup. Eventually, following its second token sale, along with the use of its now-stocked up war chest, Civil intends to release a blockchain-publishing WordPress plugin, a “community governance application,” and a developer tool for utilizing data gathered by the firm’s operations.

The Brooklyn-based firm also inked a strategic deal with the world-renowned Associated Press, as reported by NewsBTC on a previous occasion, who will use Civil’s products to better its business in multiple capacities. Along with the Associated Press, Forbes also recently joined hands with Civil, which will see the major media outlet run the startup’s blockchain applications through the works. So while a failed funding round may have spelled the end of any other crypto project, Civil’s drive for innovation likely only rose exponentially after its ICO went kaput.

Article Produced By
Nick Chong

https://www.newsbtc.com/2018/10/17/journalism-blockchain-startup-civil-cancels-ico-refunds-investors/

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GG World Announces Reverse ICO as It Prepares to Offer Regulated Blockchain Lotteries

GG World Announces Reverse ICO as It Prepares to Offer Regulated Blockchain Lotteries

 

GG World’s ICO has been announced

to start from November 2, 2018, and the investors are keen to discover the benefits of this revolutionary idea, offering completely transparent, online and government-regulated national lotteries to players and interested investors, globally. Identifying a pressing need for disruption in a market which is incredibly popular, yet notably old-fashioned, GG World Lottery has come up with a solution that can bring the industry up-to-speed by implementing blockchain and other state-of-the-art technologies.

With a team of seasoned veterans and innovative approach, the GG World Lottery project stands out from the rest of the projects. Unlike other projects in the crypto-sector, the company has taken a reverse ICO approach to raise funds and build a strong community of interested investors, players, and even governments. The GGC token, to be issued as a part of the token sale also brings special benefits to the participants as token holders.

Why Is GG World ICO Interesting for the Investors?

The upcoming GG World Lottery ICO will undoubtedly become one of the best options to invest in 2018: an extraordinary professional team with a substantial industry background, unique offering with lucrative gains for investors and token holders, an ability to get the lifetime revenue share. By taking part in the GG World reverse ICO, investors will become eligible to receive a reverse share – USP of the platform’s special business model. The model includes the distribution of dividends based on jackpot prize wins. Overall, the platform intends to create a win-win situation for everyone including investors and lottery operators (government or private).

The GG World Lottery platform protects both players and users by employing blockchain nodes. It provides additional transparency by ensuring fairness of draws through the integration of TRNG technology based on Quantis True Random Number Generator. Also, it will utilize the advantages offered by DLT to share profits with eligible community members and respective jurisdictions as per their existing regulatory and legal frameworks. In addition, the platform also allocates a significant percentage of the profits, to be channeled to verified charitable organizations

The Rise of the Online Gambling Industry

For starters, GG World Lottery platform will take care of the issues that come with regulations while improving transparency levels by offering the lottery on Ethereum smart contracts. The platform will run on mobile devices, for added convenience and easy accessibility to the players, which will in turn appeal to more players and give them a chance to participate in world-class lottery programs.

With a model built around security, transparency, ease-of-use, and accessibility, GG World Lottery hopes to tap into unexplored markets such as the African, Asian, and South American continents. Thanks to GG World Lottery blockchain platform, the gambling industry is also set to receive a facelift as it will get rid of outdated lottery hardware such as communication routers, ticket dispensers, monitors, scanners, tickets, and terminals. In addition to removing retailers and other intermediaries from the equation, the platform will provide numerous advantages to the players by enabling them to play right at their homes while eliminating fraudsters from the lottery ecosystem.

What Makes the Project Special?

  • It’s a Reverse ICO – Not a Startup with Merely an Idea

GG World Lottery knows better than to step into a vastly competitive market of the kind empty-handed. The project is responsible for developing one of the most unique products in this category – comprehensive white-label lottery software which offers a ticket-purchase courier service for the most well-known lotteries throughout the world. This allows it to open multiple lottery ticket-selling websites on behalf of its partners.

  • Backed by Professionals

The project’s team consists of industry experts with decades of experience in the field of national lotteries. GG World Lottery’s CEO, Mark Hutchinson is a start-up expert with a background in some of the early lotteries in the US, including Wisconsin, Kansas, and Colorado. Furthermore, Mark is one of the founding members of Lotto America, which grew to become the biggest lottery in the world – the Powerball.

  • A Lot to Come in Future

The company isn’t just starting the GG World Lottery. Apart from this, they are creating numerous African, South American and Asian lotteries. It has signed agreements with official regulators in a range of specified countries to be an official channel partner or to run national lotteries. They will be entirely online, government-backed and regulated, and mobile friendly.

  • Enhanced Transparency

GG World Lottery has introduced its True Random number Generator (TRNG). The project has come up with a unique system which will deliver entirely true random numbers which is based on the natural randomness in the world.

About the ICO

The ICO is starting on November 2nd and will run till January 31st, 2019. GG World Lottery’s ICO participants, token holders will also receive a quarterly-paid revenue share based on each GG World Lottery Jackpot prize win. The company has already signed NDAs with multiple regulatory bodies throughout the world that would increase the value of the GGC token.

Article Produced By
GG World

https://www.newsbtc.com/2018/10/14/gg-world-announces-reverse-ico-prepares-to-offer-regulated-blockchain-lotteries/

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How to Use AirDrop to Securely Share or Transfer Files

How to Use AirDrop to Securely Share or Transfer Files

There are many ways to transfer files from one Mac to another,

and a few ways to transfer files to and from iOS devices. The easiest and most practical way to do this is to use AirDrop, a feature built into iOS, since version 7, and macOS, since Lion (Mac OS X 10.7). Macs and iOS devices built since 2012 support AirDrop. In this article, I'm going to show you how to use AirDrop to quickly and securely transfer files across your devices. I'll also teach you how to configure AirDrop so you don't get potentially malicious files from people you don't know.

How AirDrop Works

AirDrop uses an interesting combination of technologies to transfer files securely. It uses Bluetooth to find devices that you can send to, and the device you send from creates a secure peer-to-peer Wi-Fi network connection with the receiving device and transfers the file(s). This transfer does not use the Internet, nor a local Wi-Fi network; you don't need to be on a Wi-Fi network to use AirDrop. This makes it practical anywhere, such as in the field, where you may want to transfer files from, say, an iPhone to a MacBook Pro.

There is no limit to file size, and files transfer as fast as their individual hardware allows. Since you're not transferring files over a network, you don't share bandwidth with anyone. As a test, I transferred a one-gigabyte file from my iMac to my MacBook Pro over AirDrop in about 50 seconds. This will be slower if the devices are further apart (they were both on my desk), and if there's interference with other devices around. Also, AirDrop only works with devices that are within about 10 meters, or 30 feet, because it uses Bluetooth to create a connection (that's the distance limit for Bluetooth connectivity), then creates the peer-to-peer Wi-Fi network.

How to Use AirDrop

AirDrop is the simplest way to transfer files from one device to another. To use AirDrop, both devices need to have Bluetooth and Wi-Fi on, and neither device should be acting as a personal hotspot. On the Mac, there are two ways to use AirDrop. The first is to go to AirDrop in the Finder by choosing Go > AirDrop, or pressing Command-Shift-R. A window shows which devices are available to received files. (All devices need to be awake to display: Macs can't be asleep, and iOS devices need to have their screen on.)

If you send a photo via AirDrop to a Mac, the receiver will have two options as to how to save it. If they click Accept, they can choose to save it to the Photos app or to the Downloads folder. On an iOS device, photos will be saved to the Photos app, and, for other file types, the receiver will see a list of apps to open the file, depending on the file type.

Another way to send files via AirDrop is to use the Sharing menu. On iOS, tap the Share button, then you'll see the AirDrop section populate with any devices in range that can accept files. On the Mac, right-click a file, then choose Share > AirDrop to bring up a dialog asking you which device you want to send a file. And you can send more than just files. You can send web pages from a browser, tweets from a Twitter client, a song from the Music app on iOS, and more. Wherever you see the share button—the small square with the upward-pointing arrow—you can share something via AirDrop.

How to Keep AirDrop Secure

As mentioned above, when sharing a file, you'll see any device within range that can accept files in AirDrop dialogs. These may be your devices—say you want to send a file from your iPhone to your Mac—and it could also be devices owned by your friends, colleagues, or even strangers. Because of this, it's important to set up AirDrop so it's secure.

To do this on the Mac, invoke AirDrop (in the Finder, Go > AirDrop), then, at the bottom of the Finder window, you'll see "Allow me to be discovered by." There are three options: No One (which turns off AirDrop access), Contacts Only (which displays your AirDrop devices only to people in your contacts and uses the Apple IDs in Contacts), and Everyone (which means, well, anyone within range).

You should most certainly not set this to Everyone. If you do, you'll run the risk of receiving unsolicited files. These may be explicit photos that people send you, or could even be malicious files. You may want to temporarily change this setting to Everyone if, for example, you're in a meeting and someone who is not in your contacts wants to send you a file, but remember to change it back later. It's worth noting that, on a Mac, AirDrop is inherently more secure than file sharing, which could allow attackers to get into your Mac. If you travel a lot, it's a good idea to turn off file sharing on your laptop, because anyone on a public Wi-Fi network could access your Mac, whereas with AirDrop, the limit of 10m/30ft makes access more difficult.

When Apple first introduced AirDrop—together with features that use similar technology, such as Handoff and Continuity—the feature was buggy and unreliable. It is now rock-solid for me, and it's the way I transfer most files from one of my Macs to another, and to and from my iPhone and iPad. It's fast, it's not finicky—no more need to mount network volumes—and it's reliable, as long as you keep it secure.

Article Produced By
Kirk McElhearn

Kirk McElhearn writes about Macs, iPods, iTunes, books, music and more on his blog Kirkville. He is co-host of the Intego Mac Podcast, The Next Track, and PhotoActive, and a regular contributor to The Mac Security Blog, TidBITS, and several other websites and publications. Kirk has written more than twenty books, including Take Control books about iTunes, LaunchBar, and Scrivener.

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South Korean Government to Decide on Cryptocurrency ICO Legalization in November

South Korean Government to Decide on Cryptocurrency ICO Legalization in November

A South Korean official has said

that the government is likely to announce its official stance on cryptocurrency ICOs in November. This statement was made during a National Assembly audit on Wednesday.

ICO Legalization: To be or Not to Be

According to The investor, Hong Nam-Ki, the chief of the Office for Government Policy Coordination, responding to a question raised on the government’s stance on

ICOs said:

We have had several discussions (on ICOs). Once the survey results are in by end-October, we plan to finalize the government’s stance.

In September the FSS commenced a study among some companies that are conducting or in the process of issuing an ICO in the country despite the ban. Various reports out of South Korea show a divide in government opinion in regards to Initial Coin Offerings. Also speaking at the National Assembly audit meeting, Choi Jong-Ku, chairman of the Financial Services Commission (FSC) reiterated the initial ban on ICOs. The chairman stressed the Commission’s stance to continue with the sweeping prohibition on cryptocurrency fundraising activities and

exchanges.

Although many people call for the government to allow initial coin offerings, there are still uncertainties related to such a move as well as the possibility of serious fallouts.

Meanwhile, Min Seong-woo, a member of the National Assembly is asking for the legalization of ICOs. The lawmaker while clamoring for ICO legalization also called for robust regulations to prevent speculation, money laundering, and fraud.

Current Cryptocurrency Regulatory Paradigm in South Korea

There is currently a ban on Initial Coin Offerings and anonymous crypto trading in South Korea. Despite the ban, the country is yet to release official regulations concerning cryptocurrency exchanges and trading. Throughout 2018, various reports have surfaced regarding drafted policies aimed at regulating the crypto space.

Earlier in the year, EWN reported on plans by the country’s legislative arm to ease crypto trading. In July, local media said that the FSC and FSS were working to create a favorable regulatory framework for the crypto exchange operators.

The Director of the KFIU (Korea Financial Intelligence Unit) has proposed stricter regulations for crypto exchanges, suggesting regulating exchanges similarly to commercial banks. In a country with zero tolerance for money laundering, legalizing ICOs which are currently viewed as a possible tool for money laundering and fraud, might take a while.

Article Produced By
Osato Avan-Nomayo

For quite by chance, I discovered Bitcoin in 2010 and I have been an ardent enthusiast ever since. I enjoy cryptography, mathematics, and theoretical physics. If I am not writing about cryptocurrency, I am attempting to beat my scrabble high score.

https://ethereumworldnews.com/south-korean-government-to-decide-on-cryptocurrency-ico-legalization-in-november/

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AirDrop: The Ultimate Guide

AirDrop: The Ultimate Guide

AirDrop lets you quickly and easily transfer files between iPhones, iPads, and Macs.

It uses Bluetooth LE to broadcast, discover, and negotiate connections, and point-to-point Wi-Fi to transfer data. That makes it fast, power-efficient, and secure! When you're using AirDrop between iPhones and iPads, you can AirDrop photos, videos, contacts, Passbook passes, Voice Memos, Map locations, and any and everything else that appears on a Share sheet.

How to turn on AirDrop for iPhone or iPad

AirDrop lets you choose between enabling it for just your contacts or for everyone. "Contacts" requires more work, as you and the person you want to AirDrop with both have to be logged into iCloud and be in each other's Contacts. "Everyone" is easier but means random people you don't know can send you prank AirDrops.

Tap Contacts Only or Everyone to turn AirDrop on.

  1. Launch Control Center by swiping up from the bottom bezel of your iPhone or iPad.
  2. Make sure both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi are active. If they're not, just tap on them. (You don't have to be on a Wi-Fi network, you just need Wi-Fi on to transfer).
  3. Tap AirDrop.

How to AirDrop files from your iPhone or iPad

You can AirDrop files from any iPhone or iPad app that includes the built-in Share sheet, and you can share to anyone and any of their devices that show up in the Share sheet.

Tap the person or device you want to share to.

  1. Find the file you'd like to send with AirDrop (I chose a photo).
  2. Tap the Share button on the bottom right of your screen (looks like a box with an arrow coming out of the top).

Note: If you choose Contacts Only, make sure you're logged into iCloud. Apple won't share your contacts with another device to determine if there's a match; it'll check both your iCloud accounts instead. Then, if there is a match, it'll show you your own version of the contact on your own device. That way, no data gets leaked.

If you choose Everyone, even though you are highly visible to other devices, you will always be prompted when someone is trying to share files with you through AirDrop. If you don't recognize the sender, or do not want to receive the files, you can always choose not to accept them. Files sent through AirDrop will appear in the app that typically handles those sorts of files — i.e. photos will show up in Photos.

How to block AirDrop with restrictions for iPhone and iPad

If you want to not just turn off AirDrop but block it completely, for example on your child's iPhone or iPad, you can use restrictions — also known as parental controls. Tap on Enable Restrictions at the top if you don't already have them turned on. If you do, skip down to step 6.

Switch AirDrop to Off.

  1. Launch the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.
  2. Tap on General.
  3. Tap on Restrictions.
  4. Enter a passcode that you'll use to enable and disable apps.

How to troubleshoot AirDrop on iPhone and iPhone

AirDrop feels miraculous when it's working, frustrating when it's not. If you're having trouble with AirDrop on your iPhone or iPad, here are some fixes:

How to turn on (or off) AirDrop for Mac

AirDrop lets you choose between enabling it for just your contacts or for everyone. "Contacts" requires more work, as you and the person you want to AirDrop with both have to be logged into iCloud and be in each other's Contacts. "Everyone" is easier but means random people you don't know can send you prank AirDrops.

  1. Launch the Finder on your Macs.
  2. Click on AirDrop in the left navigation.
  3. Select Off to disable AirDrop, Contacts Only to enable only your contacts to AirDrop you, or Everyone to let everyone AirDrop you.

How to AirDrop from your Mac using the drag and drop

If you want to grab some files and quickly throw them into AirDrop, the fastest way to do it is using drag and drop.

  1. Launch Finder on your Mac.
  2. Find the files you want to AirDrop.
  3. Drag the files over AirDrop in the sidebar.
  4. Hover there until the Finder changes to the AirDrop window.
  5. Drop the files onto the picture of the contact you want to share them with.

How to AirDrop from your Mac using the context menu

If you prefer to control/right-click on your Mac, you can access AirDrop that way as well.

  1. Launch Finder on your Mac.
  2. Find the file you want to share.
  3. Control/right click on the file and then choose Share from the menu.
  4. Choose AirDrop from the sub-menu.
  5. Click on the picture of the person you want to share with.

How to AirDrop from your Mac using the Share sheet

You can also AirDrop files using the Share sheet on macOS, including from the Finder and Safari.

  1. Click on the Share button, typically at the top right.
  2. Select AirDrop
  3. Click on the picture of the person you want to share with

How to troubleshoot AirDrop on on Mac

If contacts don't show up in the AirDrop interface, try these solutions, in order:

  • Toggle Bluetooth and/or Wi-Fi off and back on to reset the connections.
  • Turn off Instant Hotspot to free up the Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connections.
  • Temporarily switch to Everyone to remove any chance of contact mismatch.

Article Produced By
Rene Ritchie
and
Cella Lao Rousseau

https://www.imore.com/airdrop

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