Tag Archives: ICOs

John McAfee Will No Longer Promote ICOs Cites SEC Threats’

John McAfee Will No Longer Promote ICOs, Cites ‘SEC Threats’

Anti-virus pioneer and crypto evangelist John McAfee

tweeted that he will no longer work with initial coin offerings (ICOs) or promote them due to “threats” from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The SEC declined to comment on his statement. In April, McAfee revealed that he charges $105,000 per tweet to promote cryptocurrency projects and products. McAfee claimed that if you divided the cost by his total number of Twitter followers, the “cost per investor reached” is only $0.13, to which he added, “This is orders of magnitude less than any other approach.” In January, Cointelegraph asked McAfee in an interview whether anyone had tried to pay him for promoting a project or product, and if so, which projects.

McAfee replied:

“I would say definitely they tried to pay me. I'm not going to talk about my personal finances where I make my money or from who. I set up on stage as it’s my business and it should be everybody's business. And actually, I think it's rude to even ask such questions of people. No offense.”

When asked whether he felt responsible for the pump-and-dump schemes that sometimes follow his endorsement, he said, “Absolutely not.” Last month, McAfee announced plans to release his own “fiat” currency backed by cryptocurrency, which will be redeemable for face time with him. He said that the  McAfee Promissory Note will be connected to a blockchain by tokens and can be redeemed for up to 100 minutes of personal time with him at a location anywhere in the world.

The crypto advocate also hit headlines earlier this month when he announced a 2020 presidential bid as a way to serve the crypto community. McAfee then tweeted about the run, noting that although he doesn’t think he actually has a “chance of winning,” the bid will give him a platform to tell the “truth.”

Last month, the SEC launched a fake ICO website to increase awareness of the typical warning signs of scam ICOs and to promote investor education. The website includes such details as a misleading and blurry white paper, guaranteed returns claims, celebrity endorsements, and a countdown clock that is “quickly running out on the deal of a lifetime.” In April, SEC Commissioner Robert Jackson criticized ICOs, stating that the crypto space “has been full of troubling developments that we’ve seen at the SEC, and especially the ICO space.”

Article Produced By
Ana Alexandre

Total change in her career took Anastasia into the world of analytics and business information as a researcher and translator in 2010. Some time later she got into FinTech, a dynamically developing segment at the intersection of the financial services and technology. Ana joined Cointelegraph in September 2017.

https://cointelegraph.com/news/john-mcafee-will-no-longer-promote-icos-cites-sec-threats

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South Korea to Develop Crypto Beach’ Modelled After Switzerland’s Crypto Valley’

South Korea to Develop ‘Crypto Beach’, Modelled After Switzerland’s ‘Crypto Valley’

South Korea has revealed plans to launch a blockchain center

in Busan city modeled on the Swiss Crypto Valley, local news outlet Edaily reported June 14. At a recent blockchain event in Seoul “2018 Global Blockchain Conference,” chairman of the Korea ICT Financial Convergence Association Oh Jung-geun claimed that the organization seeks to build a space similar to the “Crypto Valley” located in the Swiss canton of Zug. "We need a place to concentrate on the cryptographic industry in Korea like the Crypto Valley in Switzerland," Oh said at the event.

The association reportedly plans to launch the “Crypto Beach” space at Haeundae, Busan. Located in eastern Busan, South Korea, Haeundae is an affluent beachfront community that attracts thousands of tourists each summer. The space has also been classified as a commercial development center by the government in recent decades. The Association reportedly plans to discuss the project with Busan authorities on Aug. 30. Oh pointed out that many South Korean companies must launch initial coin offerings (ICOs) overseas due to the government’s current ban on ICOs. Oh expressed concern about the lack of understanding of the new technology and its benefits by local authorities and their strict regulations.

In September 2017, South Korean financial authorities announced a ban on ICOs, claiming they should be strictly controlled and monitored. The government has ostensibly realized the risks associated with banning the practice, such as displacement of talent and investment  overseas, as South Korean lawmakers are reportedly working on legislation that aims to lift the existing ban on ICOs. As Cointelegraph reported earlier, Switzerland is the most blockchain-friendly country in the world. Swiss Crypto Valley, a state-backed blockchain consortium was launched in March 2017 to support the development of blockchain and cryptography-related technologies and businesses. Last week, the city of Zug announced it will trial blockchain-powered municipal voting this summer.

Article Produced By
Helen Partz

Helen is passionate about learning languages, cultures and the Internet. She has years of experience working at international online advertising projects. Growing interested in Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies in late 2017, she joined Cointelegraph as a writer.

https://cointelegraph.com/news/south-korea-to-develop-crypto-beach-modelled-after-switzerland-s-crypto-valley

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Initial Coin Offering ICO

Initial Coin Offering (ICO)

DEFINITION of 'Initial Coin Offering (ICO)'

An unregulated means by which funds are raised for a new cryptocurrency venture. An Initial Coin Offering (ICO) is used by startups to bypass the rigorous and regulated capital-raising process required by venture capitalists or banks. In an ICO campaign, a percentage of the cryptocurrency is sold to early backers of the project in exchange for legal tender or other cryptocurrencies, but usually for Bitcoin.

BREAKING DOWN 'Initial Coin Offering (ICO)'

When a cryptocurrency startup firm wants to raise money through an Initial Coin Offering (ICO), it usually creates a plan on a whitepaper which states what the project is about, what need(s) the project will fulfill upon completion, how much money is needed to undertake the venture, how much of the virtual tokens the pioneers of the project will keep for themselves, what type of money is accepted, and how long the ICO campaign will run for. During the ICO campaign, enthusiasts and supporters of the firm’s initiative buy some of the distributed cryptocoins with fiat or virtual currency. These coins are referred to as tokens and are similar to shares of a company sold to investors in an Initial Public Offering (IPO) transaction. If the money raised does not meet the minimum funds required by the firm, the money is returned to the backers and the ICO is deemed to be unsuccessful. If the funds requirements are met within the specified timeframe, the money raised is used to either initiate the new scheme or to complete it.

[ Initial coin offerings are appealing to traders for the same reason that initial public offerings – they offer a high level of volatility as the market comes up with an appropriate price for the asset. If you're interested in learning how to trade cryptocurrencies, Investopedia's Crypto Trading Course provides a comprehensive overview of the subject taught by a Wall Street veteran. You'll learn cryptocurrency basics, how to setup a wallet, and how technical analysis can be used to identify opportunities. ]

Early investors in the operation are usually motivated to buy the cryptocoins in the hope that the plan becomes successful after it launches which could translate to a higher cryptocoin value than what they purchased it for before the project was initiated. An example of a successful ICO project that was profitable to early investors is the smart contracts platform called Ethereum which has Ethers as its coin tokens. In 2014, the Ethereum project was announced and its ICO raised $18 million in Bitcoins or $0.40 per Ether. The project went live in 2015 and in 2016 had an ether value that went up as high as $14 with a market capitalization of over $1 billion.

ICOs are similar to IPOs and crowdfunding. Like IPOs, a stake of the startup or company is sold to raise money for the entity’s operations during an ICO operation. However, while IPOs deal with investors, ICOs deal with supporters that are keen to invest in a new project much like a crowdfunding event. But ICOs differ from crowdfunding in that the backers of the former are motivated by a prospective return in their investments, while the funds raised in the latter campaign are basically donations. For these reasons, ICOs are referred to as crowdsales.

Although there are successful ICO transactions on record and ICOs are poised to be disruptive innovative tools in the digital era, investors are cautioned to be wary as some ICO or crowdsale campaigns are actually fraudulent. Because these fund-raising operatives are not regulated by financial authorities such as the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC), funds that are lost due to fraudulent initiatives may never be recovered.

The rapid ICO surge in 2017 incurred regulations from a series of governmental and nongovernmental In early September, 2017, the People's Bank of China officially banned ICOs, citing it as disruptive to economic and financial stability. The central bank said tokens cannot be used as currency on the market and banks cannot offer services relating to ICOs. As a result, both Bitcoin and Ethereum tumbled, and it was viewed as a sign that regulations of cryptocurrencies are coming. The ban also penalizes offerings already completed. In early 2018, Facebook, Twitter, and Google all banned ICO advertisements. 

Article Produced By
Investopedia

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/i/initial-coin-offering-ico.asp

 
 

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Russian Institutions to Trial Central Bank ICO Platform

Russian Institutions to Trial Central Bank ICO Platform

Two Russian financial institutions are set to test a regulatory platform

that aims to make domestic initial coin offerings (ICOs) more transparent and secure for traditional investors. Russia's National Settlement Depository (NSD) announced on Thursday that it is working with Sberbank CIB, the bank's corporate and investment banking arm, to test an ICO issuance platform launched by the Bank of Russia – the country's central bank – in April.

According to an announcement, in the testing environment, a company named Level One will launch a token sale, for which Sberbank will act as the "issuance coordinator and anchor investor." The NSD, on the other hand, will serve as the custodian, recording and settling transactions, as well as safeguarding the assets. The firms say the platform will ultimately provide transparency that would reduce risks for traditional investors in the token issuance process. It's hoped the test, along with feedback from the central bank, will help improve the platform before it can be scaled up for real-world use.

Igor Bulantsev, senior vice president of Sberbank and head of Sberbank CIB, said:

"Sberbank CIB considers the Russian ICO market to be very promising. Many Sberbank clients are interested in this type of investment, and we plan to promote this service proactively once the appropriate legislative framework comes into effect; we will be one of the drivers to institutionalize and popularize this type of transaction."

As previously reported by CoinDesk, the Bank of Russia and the Ministry of Finance have already resolved a disagreement over one draft bill covering ICOs, and the country has now slated in a summer deadline for introducing two relevant pieces of legislation. Eddie Astanin, chairman of the executive board at the NSD, said the end goal of the project is to allow "the emergence of a new type of asset for investors" and the circulation of digital assets on the secondary market.

Article Produced By
Wolfie Zhao
wolfie@coindesk.com

A member of the CoinDesk editorial team since June 2017, Wolfie writes all things about the blockchain and cryptocurrency. He studies Business and Economic Reporting at New York University, and does not currently hold value in any digital currencies or projects

https://www.coindesk.com/russian-institutions-to-trial-central-banks-ico-platform/

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Crisis: After 30 Billion Invested Most Crypto ICOs Have Nothing to Show

Crisis: After $30 Billion Invested, Most Crypto ICOs Have Nothing to Show

Over the past two years,

initial coin offering (ICO) projects in the crypto market have raised more than $30 billion. Yet, most ICO projects have little to show, especially pertaining to user growth, blockchain adoption, and overall user activity on decentralized systems.

It Will Only Get Worse

A handful of tokens have demonstrated success in establishing clear vision, growth paths, and valid use cases of blockchain technology that benefits users. Binance Coin (BNB), for instance, which already operates as the base cryptocurrency of the Binance exchange, will be extensively utilized to process peer-to-peer trades upon the launch of the Binance decentralized exchange (DEX). Tens of thousands of merchants have also recently started to use BNB to accept crypto payments.

0x (ZRX), the native cryptocurrency of the 0x decentralized exchange protocol, is necessary to facilitate liquidity amongst many decentralized exchanges that operate on top of the 0x protocol. While there are several tokens in the market that represent viable applications of the blockchain, the vast majority of projects have ambiguous roadmaps and long-term strategies.

As Uber’s Sam Gellman said:

“After $30 billion invested in the past two years in ICOs there still isn’t a single crypto app with a real user base for anything other than speculating on crypto. The BTC price movement is tough, but the lack of real user base for anything they’re investing in is tougher.”

With regulatory hurdles set forth by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the ICO ecosystem will become even more difficult for both innovators and projects. This week, the U.S. SEC cracked down on two ICO projects called AirFox and Paragon, characterizing their token sales as unregistered security offerings and requesting the two tokens to refund all of their investors. “They have also agreed to compensate investors who purchased tokens in the illegal offerings if an investor elects to make a claim. The registration undertakings are designed to ensure that investors receive the type of information they would have received had these issuers complied with the registration provisions of the Securities Act of 1933 (“Securities Act”) prior to the offer and sale of tokens in their respective ICOs.”

The U.S. SEC emphasized that it is in support of the blockchain and the usage of newly emerging technologies. But, the commission said that market participants must acknowledge and adhere to local regulations. “We wish to emphasize, however, that market participants must still adhere to our well-established and well-functioning federal securities law framework when dealing with technological innovations, regardless of whether the securities are issued in certificated form or using new technologies, such as blockchain.

Importance of Bear Market

The bear market of 2018 will filter good projects from the bad, and those that survive will be projects that have a clear vision, roadmap, active user base, and a competitive model. As the capital in the market drops, investors who previously invested in every new project in the market will become more cautious and it will be challenging for token sales without competitive strategies to appeal to the public. Over time, as investors learn to conduct due dilligence and the market evolves into a more competitive sector, underperforming projects will naturally see a decline in investment opportunities, user activity, and demand.

Article Produced By
Blockchain News

https://www.ccn.com/crisis-after-30-billion-invested-most-crypto-icos-have-nothing-to-show/

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France Attempts to Attract New Cryptocurrency ICO Token Issuers with New Legal Framework

France Attempts to Attract New Cryptocurrency ICO Token Issuers with New Legal Framework

France Tries to Attract Crypto-Issuers

France is looking to improve its stance toward cryptocurrencies by allowing their use, but with regulations in place to provide oversight. If France does establish regulations to oversee cryptocurrencies, it will be the first country in the world to do so, insofar as it relates to initial coin offerings. Those who are pro-regulation argue that coin issuers that agree to the regulation will be viewed as more trustworthy by investors, thus leading to more credibility in the long-term. Regulatory authorities will also issue a certification to issuers. It is important to note that issuers will also need to relent to having their profits taxed.

According to Fabrice Heuvrard, an auditor with a government task force responsible for developing accounting-related rules for ICOs, “The community is ready to pay taxes as long s they are not confiscatory.” France is looking to release new rules regulating the industry by next year. By regulating the industry and coaxing cryptocurrency platforms out of the shadows, so to say, the country may be able to create a market for companies interested in raising capital for ICOs and all the while receiving revenue and enhancing security for those who invest.

France is not the only country moving in such a direction. For example, though England does not regulate ICOs, it does have some financial oversight to determine whether the issuance of an ICO is under the purview of regulatory authority. As for the United States, the Securities and Exchange Commission has been considering establishing that ICOs and cryptocurrency are subject to the commission’s purview. However, the country has yet to establish strict rules. On the far end of the spectrum, China has completely banned cryptocurrencies due to concerns about fraud.

The position that France is taking may be a positive approach because it allows investors to verify the parties involved in the issuance of a new coin and they can also determine what happens if a project is unsuccessful. This ultimately leads to more confidence in the process. As of late, the country has had ICOs that have raised 90 million euros. According to businessman and CEO of a Canada-based company, “The different regulators have been hyper, hyper proactive.” A French official also pointed out that there are still issues related to the tax status and whether it has been settled. Right now, the country needs to consider how much revenue is being raised and what is the best tax rate.

Allard stated,

“Our plan is to declare the money raised as revenue and pay taxes on the profits we will make on those revenues. Since we are not close to making any profits, it doesn’t really affect us.”

Article Produced By
Bitcoin Exchange Guide News Team

https://bitcoinexchangeguide.com/france-attempts-to-attract-new-cryptocurrency-ico-token-issuers-with-new-legal-framework/

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What Is An ICO Token And How Does It work?

What Is An ICO Token
And How Does It work?

What’s the definition of crypto token?

It's an entity with a value specified by the eminent. If it's a fashion startup, one token can be equal to one dress or a yearly license of a software in case of a hi-tech startup. You even can issue tokens of yourself and a token holder will be able to buy an hour of your work with the token. You can “tokenize” everything.

What’s the difference between cryptocurrency coins and tokens?

This is a difficult part. The easiest answer: tokens are not a currency. You don’t need to create a Blockchain to issue tokens, which is a must-have for a cryptocurrency, but you use an existing one (usually Ethereum, which was originally created as a platform for smart contracts and evolved to be a currency). A coin is a money equivalent, something that defines value and serves as a value transfer. A token is a symbol of a contract, the value does not depend on mining, gold price or any dynamic market criteria. A friend of mine once gave me a note saying that he will always make me a coffee on demand. He still does it, after 10 years, it was a heck good token!

What is a token contract and how does it work?

Ok, a token is not a coin, got it. But still, something should regulate it’s transaction, value etc? How does that work? You do need a platform for it. Let’s take Etherium as an example, since its one of the most popular platforms for smart tokens.

Here is the full contract cycle:

  1. Tokens creation: a company writes the basic rules (tokens amount, token value, special conditions). Once created the platform will serve as a very smart notary for all the future transactions, making sure all the conditions are carried out.
  2. Tokens acquisition: when somebody wants to buy a token, the process is really similar to buying a coke in a vending machine. You approach a machine, drop the coin and push the button “coke” (choose the token you want to buy). The machine checks if there are “cokes” in stock and if you are eligible to buy it. If everything is fine- you get your drink (or token in our case). The machine says “have a nice day” and updates the stock info (one coke less now).
  3. Token transaction: In case you have a coke, you can just pass it to your friend. For money or for free. In tokens reality, you have your token wallet which is supported by the same platform that issued the token. You can transfer your token using the wallet. And again, a virtual notary, powered by a smart contract, will make sure you do it according to the rules. Moreover, all the wallets activity is constantly recorded and being updated.

Is all this free? Nope. Somebody needs to pay for the notary, vending machine technician and coke delivery. In the token world – the operation processing called “gas.” So, each time you ask to buy or sell tokens, there will be some “gas” spent and you will pay its fee.

Note: the fee is not static. It depends on a number of transactions awaiting. You can define the max cap you are willing to pay for your gas. If the token cost is, say, $10 and the gas fee is $20 is not a great deal, isn’t it? So, you can say that you pay no more than $2 for your gas, click “submit” and find something else to do meanwhile. The system will serve the highest gas bids first and eventually yours when your time will come. There is a chance, you will wait for a long time (if others are willing to pay more than you). But you always can rise the gas cap.

Types of tokens

Let’s see the most common types of tokens.

Token – token (Utility tokens), the most popular type

Remember amusements parks from the childhood? Roller coasters, carousels, hot dogs and cotton candy? At the entrance, you’ve got tokens to buy food and enter the attractions. So, let’s pretend that a company is an amusement park and with the tokens, you can buy different services just as you do with carousels and hot dogs. Now, to make the analogy perfect, let’s say that you can buy lots of tokens before the park is officially opened, or when it’s just opened. If the park becomes popular, its tokens will be much more expensive. Like $10 for a hot dog. But a smart child who bought the tokens before the opening will still enjoy his meal for $1. This is basically the idea behind issuing and buying tokens. But if in the amusement park you buy the tokens at the entrance, where do you get a cryptocurrency token? The answer is ICO – Initial Coin Offering.

Token – stock (Equity tokens)

In this case, ICO is completely equal to IPO. Usually, token-stocks are issued when a startup does not require a crypto-technology. In this case, token holders will get dividend or fixed commission. They also will be able to take part is the company decisions. All this honor for supporting the project in the beginning of its life.

Token – credit

This is a loan; a holder gives to a startup. It’s another way to rise money. For example, you invest X to get X + 10 percent.

Token – combo

If you are not completely confused, you will be now: sometimes a token can belong to more than one type. For example, tokens Sia and Digix are both tokens and stocks. And Steemit has all the three types of tokens (Steem, Steem Dollars (SBD) and Steem Power (a denomination of VESTS).

How do you trade tokens?

This part is pretty similar to coins. You have to register on an exchange for buying and selling tokens. The transaction conditions can be really complicated: the contract can include multiple rules like “you can sell it only before a specified date” or “after some date but only for a certain vendor.” So, when investing in tokens, you should read the “small letters” really thoroughly.

Article Produced By
Cointelegraph

https://cointelegraph.com/ico-101/what-is-an-ico-token-and-how-does-it-work

 

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University of British Columbia Study: Compliance Trilemma’ Limits Potential of ICOs

University of British Columbia Study: ‘Compliance Trilemma’ Limits
Potential of ICOs

Initial Coin Offerings (ICO) are facing a regulatory
“compliance trilemma,”

according to a recent study released Nov. 19. The research, funded by regtech platform iComply and “supported by” Canadian non-profit national research organization Mitacs Canada, was carried out by the University of British Columbia (UBC).To prepare the report, UBC’s research team investigated the ICO space over the course of six months, focusing primarily on North America, but also delving into some other countries and jurisdictions. The team conducted 45 qualitative interviews with individuals in the ICO space, including representatives of the finance, law, and science sectors of the field.

Per the study, ICO issuers face a “trilemma,” wherein they can only address two of three objectives at a time, those being “having a compliant offering,” “reaching a distributed pool of investors,” in a manner that is “cost-effective.” The researchers define compliance as following regulations in the home jurisdiction of both the issuer and investor. While a broadly distributed pool of investors is said to be the principal benefit of an ICO as a funding mechanism, the cost of complying with financial regulators becomes “much greater” if the investor pool becomes more distributed.

“If issuers forgo these costs, the risk of being non-compliant rises significantly. The result is a trilemma, whereby issuers currently must forgo one of these goals to realize the other two, or to compromise on all three,” the study explains. The trilemma further reveals four basic approaches available to ICO issues, which are “the Maverick ICO,” “the Private ICO,” “the Hybrid ICO,” and no ICO at all. The first option refers to ignoring compliance for maximizing ICO reach and cost effectiveness, which reportedly runs a huge risk of regulatory enforcement.

The second approach focuses on targeting only accredited and institutional investors by sacrificing distribution, which may not affect cost-effectiveness but raise challenges in secondary market trading control. Regarding the Hybrid ICO, the report reads that it “compromise[s] on all three dimensions by issuing in select markets, resulting in bounded cost effectiveness, compliance and investor scope,” resulting in a combination of risks.

The researchers found that companies wishing to undergo an ICO sought relief from the trilemma through relevant regulatory authorities. Participants in the study reportedly called for amendments to regulation, including clarifications of existing regulation and development of “fundamentally new” regulatory definitions and frameworks. The study concludes that this “trilemma” has “substantially limited [the] potential” of ICOs,

noting:

“Many actors with legitimate ventures that could benefit from ICOs are likely holding back, due to combination of confusion over how exactly they might comply with financial regulations within and across jurisdictions, and the prohibitive costs of doing so manually.”

As Cointelegraph recently reported, ICO performance in the third quarter of 2018 was in part characterized by “overall disappointment," in comparison with previous quarters. Last week, Cointelegraph reported that in a self-described “first,” the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) had imposed civil penalties against two ICOs over their failure to register their token sales with the agency.

Article Produced By
Ana Alexandre

Total change in her career took Anastasia into the world of analytics and business information as a researcher and translator in 2010. Some time later she got into FinTech, a dynamically developing segment at the intersection of the financial services and technology. Ana joined Cointelegraph in September 2017.

https://cointelegraph.com/news/study-compliance-trilemma-limits-potential-of-icos

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What is an ICO Exactly?

What is an ICO, Exactly?

crypto

From Wall Street brokers to small time investors,

finance can be a dangerous game. The world’s currencies are constantly in shift, falling in and out of favour, and the results can often be disastrous (or highly fortuitous) for those involved. People win and lose big. That’s a fact of life, and it’s no different when cryptocurrencies are involved instead of regular cash. Having taken the world by storm in the past decade, the blockchain tech behind Bitcoin, Litecoin and other altcoins has changed finance – and money itself – forever. But how does one go about bringing a virtual currency into existence? Well, that’s where ICOs come in.

A Dictionary Rundown

An ICO is an initial coin offering much similar to an IPO. An initial public offering involves a new company selling shares to investors, the process underwritten by an investment bank. The company stocks are then listed on various markets. When it comes to an ICO however, no stocks or shares are sold.

Instead, it’s all about coins.

When somebody wants to launch a new cryptocurrency they’ll advertise its perks with something called a White Paper, then ask for investment from the public. Interested parties then donate existing cryptocurrency, such as Bitcoin, and in return receive some of the first rounds of, let’s say, ProfitCoin. The hope is that ProfitCoin will gain popularity, be used a lot, and as such rise in value. The investors will then, well, make a profit from their ProfitCoin ICO. Either way, they’re supporting the ecosystem and development of cryptocurrency in general.

ICOs vs Standard Investing

But why bother with an ICO? There are stocks, gold, oil, salt and pepper to be bought and sold after all. Forex already exists. Why venture into this new zone of risk and exploration? Well, put quite simply, because you may regret it otherwise. How many tech savvy folks and investors are kicking themselves for not jumping on the Bitcoin bandwagon years ago? With ICOs, said folks now have a second chance to find the next cash cow. It’s a gamble, yes, but a relatively informed one if you take the time to research. If you were to head over to the Paddy Power Casino, make your deposit, get your bonus and take to the roulette table, for example, you’d be taking a similar informed risk. You can work out the odds, see the potential for a win, and decide whether or not to take it.

An ICO is similar, but instead of knowledge of cards or probability, you need knowledge of the cryptocurrency world. You need to read the new coin’s White Paper first things first, and then you can decide whether or not to go ahead.

The All Important White Paper

An ICO White Paper is the cornerstone of any new coin campaign. It lays out what this new currency can offer that others have not, it explains how the idea works, why it works, and why it’s better than what’s come before. It is, in essence, a business pitch; interesting, thorough, well-explained. A White Paper is addressed first and foremost to you, and to other potential initial coin investors around the globe – so best brush up before trading in your precious Bitcoin for ProfitCoin. The world of finance changed when cryptocurrency came into existence, even more so when it grew into a global market. Now the world of crypto is changing thanks to ICOs, and with every White Paper comes a new opportunity to win big.

Article Produced By
FinSMEs

http://www.finsmes.com/2018/11/what-is-an-ico-exactly.html

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